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Sea Water Thermodynamic Properties?

  1. Feb 12, 2010 #1
    Im looking for thermodynamic properties of seawater, especially specific heat and enthalpy. Im designing a solar desalinator, and im trying to determine the required amounts of energy to evaporate the water.

    Is there a way in which I can determine the enthalpy of seawater by knowing the enthalpy of both salt and water?


    Thank you
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2010 #2

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    http://sam.ucsd.edu/sio210/lect_2/lecture_2.html

    http://www.tpub.com/weather3/1-17.htm

    See last page -
    http://www.whoi.edu/science/PO/people/tjoyce/whoi-mit_course/notes/course_notes_1b.pdf

    http://www.math.nyu.edu/caos_teachi.../numerical_exercises/sea_water/sea_water.html

    disclaimer: No endorsement expressed or implied
    User must verify.
     
  4. Feb 13, 2010 #3
    Thank you!
     
  5. Feb 14, 2010 #4
    I think there is a unit issue with the specific heat of 3850 J/(Kg K), given that the specific heat of water is around 2200 KJ/(Kg K).

    I just wanted to see if what im saying here is making sense.


    Thanks
     
  6. Apr 1, 2011 #5
    Kaiser Engineering did an extensive research study for the government on the thermodynamic properties of seawater about 40 years ago. The properties vary with the salinity, which also varies in different parts of the seas. It is available from the Library of Congress
     
  7. Apr 1, 2011 #6

    AlephZero

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    3850 is the right order of magnitude, depending on the salinity.

    See here - no disclaimers required for this source:
    http://www.kayelaby.npl.co.uk/general_physics/2_7/2_7_9.html
     
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