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Simple inverter schematic? (Solid state, no coil.)

  1. Jan 21, 2009 #1

    cf8

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    I was wondering if there is a simple way to make a power inverter (DC to AC) that is solid state, and does not use a coil. Actually, I'm not sure if there is a difference, but "pulsing DC" might be more what I'm thinking.

    I don't necessarily need the current to flow in reverse, but just to rapidly (that is, minimum 1 Hz) turn on/off.

    I looked at Wikipedia, and this might be what I'm looking for, but I can't figure out what to connect the base of the transistors to.

    Any ideas would be appreciated.
    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 21, 2009 #2

    dlgoff

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  4. Jan 21, 2009 #3

    cf8

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    Thanks for the response, the welcome, and the link!
    I think you may be right, but I am not sure. If I read this correctly, I would attach the battery's positive terminal to "+V", and attach the battery's negative terminal to the load. After that, attach the load's other terminal to "0V" - is this all correct?
     
  5. Jan 22, 2009 #4
    Try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverter_(electrical)

    You might also try brand names like TRACE or XANTREX (made for marine use and other applications) and check their manuals for power inverters from maybe 500watts to 5KW and more.

    I use a 2500 watt Xantrex FREEDOM inverter/charger on my boat which converts dc to ac and also acts as a 130 amp/12 v dc battery charger. Combining inverter and charger functions substantially reduces costs relative to separate functional units .
     
  6. Jan 22, 2009 #5

    dlgoff

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    Not exactly. Your power supply (battery) would connect to the +V (batt. positive) and to the 0V (batt. negative). The square wave output would be from the connection point between the R4 and Q2 collector and the Q2 emitter (or 0V point).
     
  7. Jan 31, 2009 #6

    cf8

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    Sorry for the long delay; apparently I had missed the notification email.

    Okay, so this part makes sense to me:
    But this doesn't:
    So, basically... the "load" (may not be the proper term) would go between the collector and emitter on Q2?
     
  8. Jan 31, 2009 #7

    dlgoff

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    Yep.
     
  9. Jan 31, 2009 #8

    cf8

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    Alright, gotcha.

    Thanks so much!
     
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