Simple inverter schematic? (Solid state, no coil.)

In summary, the person is looking for a power inverter that is solid state and does not use a coil. They are looking for something that can quickly turn on and off. They are also looking for an inverter that is around 2500 watts.
  • #1
cf8
33
0
I was wondering if there is a simple way to make a power inverter (DC to AC) that is solid state, and does not use a coil. Actually, I'm not sure if there is a difference, but "pulsing DC" might be more what I'm thinking.

I don't necessarily need the current to flow in reverse, but just to rapidly (that is, minimum 1 Hz) turn on/off.

I looked at Wikipedia, and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:H-bridge_inverter_cjc.png" might be what I'm looking for, but I can't figure out what to connect the base of the transistors to.

Any ideas would be appreciated.
Thanks.
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF cf8. Maybe all you need is a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multivibrator" .
 
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  • #3
dlgoff said:
Welcome to PF cf8. Maybe all you need is a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multivibrator" .
Thanks for the response, the welcome, and the link!
I think you may be right, but I am not sure. If I read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Transistor_Multivibrator.svg" correctly, I would attach the battery's positive terminal to "+V", and attach the battery's negative terminal to the load. After that, attach the load's other terminal to "0V" - is this all correct?
 
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  • #4
Try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverter_(electrical )

You might also try brand names like TRACE or XANTREX (made for marine use and other applications) and check their manuals for power inverters from maybe 500watts to 5KW and more.

I use a 2500 watt Xantrex FREEDOM inverter/charger on my boat which converts dc to ac and also acts as a 130 amp/12 v dc battery charger. Combining inverter and charger functions substantially reduces costs relative to separate functional units .
 
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  • #5
cf8 said:
Thanks for the response, the welcome, and the link!
I think you may be right, but I am not sure. If I read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Transistor_Multivibrator.svg" correctly, I would attach the battery's positive terminal to "+V", and attach the battery's negative terminal to the load. After that, attach the load's other terminal to "0V" - is this all correct?
Not exactly. Your power supply (battery) would connect to the +V (batt. positive) and to the 0V (batt. negative). The square wave output would be from the connection point between the R4 and Q2 collector and the Q2 emitter (or 0V point).
 
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  • #6
Sorry for the long delay; apparently I had missed the notification email.

Okay, so this part makes sense to me:
dlgoff said:
Not exactly. Your power supply (battery) would connect to the +V (batt. positive) and to the 0V (batt. negative).
But this doesn't:
dlgoff said:
The square wave output would be from the connection point between the R4 and Q2 collector and the Q2 emitter (or 0V point).
So, basically... the "load" (may not be the proper term) would go between the collector and emitter on Q2?
 
  • #7
cf8 said:
So, basically... the "load" (may not be the proper term) would go between the collector and emitter on Q2?
Yep.
 
  • #8
dlgoff said:
Yep.
Alright, gotcha.

Thanks so much!
 

Related to Simple inverter schematic? (Solid state, no coil.)

What is a simple inverter schematic?

A simple inverter schematic is a diagram or design that shows how to build a basic inverter circuit using solid state components, without a coil. An inverter is a device that converts DC (direct current) power into AC (alternating current) power, allowing for the use of electronic devices that require AC power.

What are solid state components?

Solid state components are electronic devices or circuits that use solid materials, such as silicon, to control the flow of electricity. They do not contain moving parts, such as coils, and are commonly used in modern electronics.

Why is there no coil in this inverter schematic?

Coils are typically used in traditional inverters to convert DC power into AC power. However, in solid state inverters, transistors and other electronic components are used to perform this conversion without the need for a coil.

What are the advantages of using a solid state inverter?

Solid state inverters are typically smaller, lighter, and more efficient than traditional inverters with coils. They also have a longer lifespan and are less prone to mechanical failures.

Can I build a simple inverter using this schematic?

Yes, this schematic can serve as a guide for building a simple inverter using solid state components. However, it is important to have a good understanding of electronics and to take safety precautions when working with electricity.

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