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Homework Help: Simple sound problems

  1. Jan 12, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    1) a longitudinal wave with a frequency of 3 Hz takes 1.7s to travel the length of a 2.5m slinky. Determine the wavelength of the wave?
    2)One tsunami had a wavelength of 750km and traveled a distance of 3700 km in 5.3 hours.
    a) what was the speed of the wave. For reference the speed of a 747 jetliner is about 350 m/s.
    B) find the frequency
    C)find the period
    3)A person lying on an air mattress in the ocean rises and falls through 1 complete cycle every five seconds. The crests of the wave causing the motion are 20m apart. Determine
    a)frequency
    b)speed of the wave
    4)the rightmost key on a piano produces a sound wave that has a frequency of 4187.6Hz. assuming that the speed of sound is 343 find the wavelength
    5)a jet skier is moving at 8.4 ms in the direction in which the waves on a lake are moving. each time he passes over a crest, he feels a bump. the bumping frequency is 1.2 Hz and the crests are separated by 5.8m. What is the wave speed
    6)the speed of a transverse wave on a string is 450 and the wavelength is .18. the amplitude of the wave is 2mm. how much time is required for a particle of the string to move through a total distance of 1 km?

    thanks for helping me!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 12, 2009 #2

    LowlyPion

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    What are your thoughts on how to solve the problems?

    I don't see what it is you are stuck on or what you have attempted.
     
  4. Jan 12, 2009 #3
    for number 1, How can i solve this without the speed?
     
  5. Jan 12, 2009 #4

    LowlyPion

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    Why don't you have the speed?

    2.5 m in 1.7 s looks like the precursor to speed to me.
     
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