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Sine waves

  1. Aug 17, 2004 #1
    What does a three-dimensional sine wave look like?

    -Sam
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 17, 2004 #2

    Zurtex

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  4. Aug 17, 2004 #3

    matt grime

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    Sine is a function of one variable, what higher dimensional analogue did you mean?
     
  5. Aug 17, 2004 #4
    It's just that I've seen too many three-dimensional crests representing electromagnetic waves, and I wanted to find out if the same was true for sine waves, or if sine waves are spiral-shaped, three-dimensionally.
     
  6. Aug 17, 2004 #5
    Remember: sine waves can be calculated using two axes (x and y) but what happens if we add a third axis of depth (z)? It would be interesting if in 3D form it looked more like a spiral than a wave.
    Same with phi. We always look at it three-dimensionally, but what if we added depth...would it not be spiral-shaped, much like I'm supposing a sine wave is?
    Remember: out of an infinite possible viewpoints, from only one will a three-dimensional object apear two-dimensional, and a two-dimensional object one-dimensional. We humans have that uniqueness in our perspectives.
     
  7. Aug 17, 2004 #6

    matt grime

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    You may continue it in many ways, there is not one that is "the" 3-d sinewaveindeed I'd say that none of them is even "a" 3-d sinewave: it could look like ripples on a pond from a dropped stone (concentric), or ridges like a piece of corrugated cardboard.
     
  8. Aug 17, 2004 #7

    Alkatran

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    Get a graphic calculator that can do 3d graphs and put in something like:
    Z = sin(x)*sin(y)
    or
    Z = Sin(xy)
    or
    Z = sin(x) + sin(y)

    etc etc...
     
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