Solving Speeds of Objects after Collision with Two Angles

In summary, the problem involves a 0.17 kg cue ball moving at 4.0 m/s that collides with a stationary 0.16 kg object ball. After the collision, the cue ball moves 60 degrees to the left and the object ball moves 30 degrees to the right. Using the conservation of momentum, we can determine that the speed of the cue ball after the collision is 2.0 m/s and the speed of the object ball is 3.7 m/s. A diagram is also provided for reference. This is an urgent request for help needed by tomorrow morning.
  • #1
Oriako
107
1

Homework Statement


A 0.17kg cue ball is moving at 4.0 m/s when it strikes a 0.16 kg stationary object ball. After the collision, the cue ball moves 60 degrees to the left of its original direction while the object ball moves 30 degrees to the right of the cue ball's original path. Determine the speed of the:
a) Cue ball after the collision. [ANS: 2.0 m/s]
b) Object ball after the collision. [ANS: 3.7 m/s]

Homework Equations


Conservation of Momentum

The Attempt at a Solution


[PLAIN]http://img89.imageshack.us/img89/1425/dscf2042x.jpg

Please help, thank you.
I need this for tomorrow morning!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
This is urgent! Please help! Thank you so much.
 

What is meant by "Solving Speeds of Objects after Collision with Two Angles"?

When two objects collide, they transfer energy and momentum to each other. The resulting speeds of the objects after the collision can be determined by solving for the velocities using the angles at which the objects collided.

How is the initial velocity of each object determined in this type of collision?

The initial velocities of the objects can be determined by using the known masses and velocities before the collision. The conservation of momentum and energy principles can be applied to solve for the initial velocities.

What are the key factors that affect the resulting speeds of the objects after the collision?

The resulting speeds of the objects after the collision are affected by the masses and velocities of the objects before the collision, as well as the angles at which the objects collide. The coefficient of restitution, which represents the elasticity of the collision, also plays a role in determining the resulting speeds.

What is the coefficient of restitution and how does it affect the resulting speeds?

The coefficient of restitution is a measure of how much kinetic energy is conserved during the collision. A higher coefficient of restitution means a more elastic collision, where more of the kinetic energy is conserved and the resulting speeds of the objects are closer to their initial velocities. A lower coefficient of restitution means a more inelastic collision, where more of the kinetic energy is lost and the resulting speeds of the objects are lower than their initial velocities.

Are there any limitations to using this method to solve for the speeds of objects after a collision?

Yes, this method assumes that the collision is perfectly elastic, meaning that no energy is lost during the collision. In reality, most collisions are at least somewhat inelastic, so the calculated speeds using this method may not be entirely accurate. Additionally, this method only applies to collisions between two objects and cannot be used for more complex collisions involving multiple objects.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
34
Views
685
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
12
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
18
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
23
Views
2K
Back
Top