Sources of Information on Engineering

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Astronuc

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For those who would like some technical references, DOE Handbooks are available on line at:

http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/standard/standard.html

Just click on the PDF link.

Look for:

DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Classical Physics, DOE-HDBK-1010-92

DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Electrical Science, Volume 1,2,3,4 of 4, DOE-HDBK-1011/1,2,3,4-92

DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow, Volume 1,2,3 DOE-HDBK-1012/1-92

DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Material Science, Volume 1 of 2 DOE-HDBK-1017/1-93

DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Material Science, Volume 2 of 2 DOE-HDBK-1017/2-93

DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory, Volume 1 of 2 (142 pages), DOE-HDBK-1019/1-93

DOE Fundamentals Handbook, Nuclear Physics and Reactor Theory, Volume 2 of 2 (128 pages), DOE-HDBK-1019/2-93

and many others.
 
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Astronuc

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A number of questions, particularly involving homework, often involve some basic engineering.

In the US, the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE - www.nspe.org) has arranged for the publication of various reference manuals as part of the training for licensing exams. The manuals contain an overview of the particular engineering discipline, some basic theory, general information, tables and fundamental equations, and example problems.

Mechanical Engineering Reference Manual (for the PE Exam)
Michael R. Lindeburg

Civil Engineering Reference Manual (for the PE Exam)
Michael R. Lindeburg

Electrical Engineering Reference Manual (for the Electrical and Computer PE Exam)
John A. Camara, Raymond B. Yarbrough

Chemical Engineering Reference Manual for the PE Exam
Michael R. Lindeburg

These can be found through on-line book stores.

I suspect Engineering Societies in other nations offer similar texts.
 

russ_watters

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I'm sticky'ing this in response to a requst by Astronuc. This is a great idea (thanks, Astronuc) and something the engineering forums have been lacking. Please post links, book suggestions, etc. to resources for engineering. This should be mostly for students, but things that may be useful for professionals would be good as well. For starters...

Dictionary of Measures, Units, and Conversions
 
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hey what type of infomation are you looking for?
 

brewnog

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Online Materials database:

Matweb
 

Astronuc

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Another thread in the Materials and Chemical Engineering asked about steels and seismic performance. I did some checking around and identified some codes that identify particular grades of steel for specific designs, e.g. steel for reinforced concrete vs steel plate for beams and columns. However, the design process involves much more than material.

The design of a structure to withstand a seismic load is very detailed. One of the best sources is the Caltrans Seismic Design Criteria Manual. It is available on-line as pdf files.

Table of Contents

Every civil and structural engineer, who is involved in design of structures, should study this document.
 

Astronuc

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PerennialII

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Some numerical software references & general sources of information

... this with emphasis to free etc. software :

... FEM based software (the first a general, really extensive collection of everything related) :

http://homepage.usask.ca/~ijm451/finite/fe_resources/
http://cern49.ce.uiuc.edu/cfm/warp3d.html [Broken]
http://vector-space.com/newpage2.htm
http://tochnog.sourceforge.net/tnhome.html

.... a Pre & Post - processor & a compliant Navier-Stokes solver + general visualization link :

http://gid.cimne.upc.es/index.html [Broken]
http://adfc.sourceforge.net/index_en.html
http://www.csc.fi/visualization/index.html [Broken]

.... BEM resources :

http://www.olemiss.edu/sciencenet/benet/
http://www.boundary-element-method.co.uk/ [Broken]
http://www.cfg.cornell.edu/software/software.htm [Broken]

.... about math libraries and software in general :

http://www.csc.fi/math_topics/Software.html [Broken]

.... general "engineer - readable" approach to PDEs and numerical solving of them :

http://www.lifelong-learners.com/pde/
 
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FredGarvin

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Just to get some basics out there...

General Design:
http://www.boltscience.com/pages/info.htm
http://www2.chicago-rawhide.com/catalog_pdf.htm [Broken]
http://www.mech.uwa.edu.au/DANotes/intro/contents.html#top

Machine Element Design:
http://www.mech.uwa.edu.au/DANotes/intro/contents.html#top
http://www.mrcbearingservices.com/engineeringdata.asp
http://www.utm.edu/departments/engin/lemaster/machine_design.htm [Broken]
http://www.co-design.co.uk/dpg/guides.htm
http://www.tapmatic.com/tech_manual/index.html [Broken]

General Engineering:
Java Learning Appletes: http://www.engapplets.vt.edu/
http://www.roymech.co.uk/index3.htm

Process Control/Instrumentation:
Omega's Technical Library (EXCELLENT SOURCE!):
http://www.omega.com/techref/
http://www.pc-education.mcmaster.ca/instrumentation/go_inst.htm

Fluids:
LMNO Engineering: http://www.lmnoeng.com/
Standard Atmosphere Calculator: http://aero.stanford.edu/StdAtm.html
Piping: http://www.pipingdesign.com/ [Broken]
Pumps Fundamentals: http://www.gouldspumps.com/cat_technews_0005.html [Broken]

Sound/Vibration:
http://www.silcom.com/~aludwig/index.htm
http://www.vibrationdata.com/tutorials.htm (EXCELLENT SOURCE!)
http://www.sandv.com/home.htm
http://www.bradford.ac.uk/research/mbdmst/rotordynamic/ [Broken]
 
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Danger

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Wow! Excellent thread, guys.
 
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Hi there:

For anywhere, anytime free engineering e-solutions for energy conversion systems, check out http://members.aol.com/engware.free [Broken].

An MS Excel file is attached.

Thanks,

Gordan
 

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Astronuc

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Hi all,

I am new on the forum and was wondering if there is a source where I can download or get engineering ebooks?

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards,

Vsdguy
 
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for prospective students
http://www.engineeringk12.org/students/default.htm [Broken]
 
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Astronuc

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vsdguy said:
I am new on the forum and was wondering if there is a source where I can download or get engineering ebooks?
Welcome to PF, vsdguy. There may not be too many free e-books available on-line. Most engineering texts must be purchased.

In what particular engineering courses/disciplines is one interested? MIT has some open courseware. http://ocw.mit.edu/index.html

One can find, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Engineering Systems Division, Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear Science and Engineering. There are many course notes available in pdf format. One can also find Mathematics here and at other university sites.

PF also has Physics, Math and Science tutorials.
 

Astronuc

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http://aiche-chicago.org/ [Broken]

The Chicago Section is one of the largest within the institute, with over 1,200 members.

American Institute of Chemical Engineers - http://www.aiche.org/ - national organization.
 
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Thank you all,

I am specificaly interested in controls. More specificaly in control engineering. PID, AC/DC controls, automation, AC drives, Power electronics. I will check the site you provided Astronuc.
Thank you all again for sharing information.

Regards,

vsdguy
 

FredGarvin

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I haven't had a chance to read through it yet, but here is a book on compressible flow. There do appear to be some things that need to be fixed. Consider it a work in progress:

http://www.potto.org/gasDynamics/index.html
 
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FredGarvin

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Google Scholar

I came across this recently while doing some patent research. It is very handy when looking for technical articles and such. It has a very nice searchable PDF interface that makes finding what you are looking for a lot easier.

Google Scholar
 
EE HomePage.com (http://www.eehomepage.com) currently has listings for 150+ free textbooks on physics, math, programming and electrical engineering topics.
 
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I have a lot of e-books on mechanical engineering. Is there a resource folder of some sort in which I can upload them?
 
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http://www.youtube.com/user/MIT

This is a very good source for learning theory. This is MIT's youtube channel. They have everything from biology, differential equations, to fluid mechanics. It's a great way to virtually sit through one of their classes. I viewed about all of their differential equations videos, I am in diff eq class in college now and it's nice to get a different view on some of the theory, and relearn what i should've learned when i was day dreaming in class.


I also just watch some of the fluid mechanic lessons, they are so interesting.



very good thread guys!
 
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Not sure if this has been posted, but I came across this awhile ago.

efunda.com
 

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