Spacing between Electrical Sockets

  • #1

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Hello here,

Please, what is the minimum spacing between sockets is based on the BSI standard or any other standard being used in the UK. I was wondering maybe there is such specification just like in the NEC which required 12 feet between sockets.

Also please, is there any major difference between rules governing electrical installation in the US and in the UK? I have read the NEC, but now I was told that was America standard and to go get acquainted with the British way.

Thank you lots
 

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  • #2
anorlunda
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Also please, is there any major difference between rules governing electrical installation in the US and in the UK? I have read the NEC, but now I was told that was America standard and to go get acquainted with the British way.
Yes, there are substantial differences. You have no choice, you must comply with the local codes. Do not attempt to rationalize your way around the rules. Just comply.
 
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  • #3
davenn
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I was wondering maybe there is such specification just like in the NEC which required 12 feet between sockets.
WOW seriously ?

I don't know what country you are from ? ..... but that's pretty restrictive ... does that mean you cannot have double outlets, like we do here in Australia and New Zealand

124000-full.jpg




I am not aware of any minimum spacing requirements in our two countries. The sockets are places where needed.
Along a workshop workbench like mine I have 3 double outlets within an 8ft workbench length



Dave
 
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  • #4
anorlunda
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I don't know about minimum distances only. My point was that you can't apply one country's rules in another country. You have to look up the local rules, whatever they are.
 
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  • #5
davenn
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My point was that you can't apply one country's rules in another country
totally agree :)
 
  • #6
Averagesupernova
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The 12 foot rule between receptacles is a maximum here in the USA. There are exceptions in some hallways and etc.
 
  • #7
davenn
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The 12 foot rule between receptacles is a maximum here in the USA. There are exceptions in some hallways and etc.

OK that is opposite to what the OP was thinking/stating where they were implying that that was the minimum
as in they couldn't be spaced closer

I am desperately trying to understand why there is a maximum distance ?
what is the point ?

I think the specific ruling needs to be stated from the USA NEC just to see if something is being lost in translation ?
 
  • #8
russ_watters
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I am desperately trying to understand why there is a maximum distance ?
what is the point ?
Convenience.
http://www.mcgarryandmadsen.com/ins...uld_the_electrical_receptacles_be_placed.html
The maximum spacing between receptacles, according to the National Electric Code, has been set at 12-feet since 1956--with no point along a wall being more than 6-feet from a receptacle. The logic behind that number is that an appliance with a standard length cord could then be plugged-in anywhere along the wall.
 
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  • #9
jim hardy
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No minimum spacing here, but an implied maximum of 12 feet
NEC210.52
(1) Spacing
Receptacles shall be installed such that no point measured horizontally along the floor line of any wall space is more than 1.8 m (6 ft.) from a receptacle outlet.



This rule provides for receptacle outlets to be installed so that an appliance or lamp with a flexible cord attached may be placed anywhere in the room near a wall and be within 6 ft. of a receptacle, minimizing the need for occupants to use extension cords. Although not an enforceable requirement, receptacles may be placed equal distances apart where there is no specific room layout for the general use of electrical equipment. Section 210.52(A)(1) does not prohibit a receptacle layout designed for intended utilization equipment or practical room use. For example, receptacles in a living room, family room, or den that are intended to serve home entertainment equipment or home office equipment may be placed in corners, may be grouped, or may be placed in a convenient location. Receptacles that are intended for window-type holiday lighting may be placed under windows. Even if more receptacles than the minimum required are installed in a room, no point in any wall space is permitted to be more than 6 ft. from a receptacle.
 
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  • #10
davenn
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thanks guys :)
 
  • #11
Ooh yeah, sorry guys, I meant to write maximum. Thanks for the correction.

So is there any such rule in the UK (like the NEC210.52 for America), that talks about spacing between sockets ?

Also please what is the book that talks about wiring regulations, british standard ?
 
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  • #14
CWatters
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Please, what is the minimum spacing between sockets is based on the BSI standard or any other standard being used in the UK. I was wondering maybe there is such specification just like in the NEC which required 12 feet between sockets.
I live in the UK.

I don't think there is any minimum separation here. At least the electrician that wired our house had no objection to anything I proposed regarding spacing. In the UK most (but not all) houses are wired with "ring" rather than "radial" wiring. The number of sockets on each ring or radial will matter but the proximity to each other shouldn't. There are restrictions on the proximity to wet areas such as baths, showers etc

The height of sockets and switches above the floor is controlled by Approved Document Part M of the Building Regulations to make it easier for disabled people. I think this applies to new houses. Changes to existing houses are covered by a catch all that they should not make things worse for disabled people.

Part P makes some electrical work "notifiable" under the Building Regulations. In theory you can still do everything yourself (DIY) and pay a fee to notify Building Control but in practice it might work out cheaper to use a qualified electrician.

I think there might be a requirement in the Building Regulations to make "adequate provision" for electrical sockets but what section that's in I've no idea.

All the Approved Documents can be found here..

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200135/approved_documents

Bandit has already linked to the 17th Edition of the wiring regs.
 
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  • #15
CWatters
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PS Also worth noting that the Building Regulations differ in England, Scotland and Wales.
 
  • #16
dlgoff
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The "book" I think you are asking about is the 17th Edition of the IET Wiring Regulations.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BS_7671
The electrical home page of the Institution of Engineering Technology states they are the publisher of BS 7671:
The IET publishes the IET Wiring Regulations: BS 7671, the industry standard for electrical installations.
For those interested in having access to this standard, they provide a digital access. There is also have a Student's hub.

@berkeman These may be good references for the Useful EE Links and Search Engines sticky.
 
  • #17
berkeman
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