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Spacing between Electrical Sockets

  1. Jul 13, 2017 #1
    Hello here,

    Please, what is the minimum spacing between sockets is based on the BSI standard or any other standard being used in the UK. I was wondering maybe there is such specification just like in the NEC which required 12 feet between sockets.

    Also please, is there any major difference between rules governing electrical installation in the US and in the UK? I have read the NEC, but now I was told that was America standard and to go get acquainted with the British way.

    Thank you lots
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 13, 2017 #2

    anorlunda

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    Yes, there are substantial differences. You have no choice, you must comply with the local codes. Do not attempt to rationalize your way around the rules. Just comply.
     
  4. Jul 13, 2017 #3

    davenn

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    WOW seriously ?

    I don't know what country you are from ? ..... but that's pretty restrictive ... does that mean you cannot have double outlets, like we do here in Australia and New Zealand

    124000-full.jpg



    I am not aware of any minimum spacing requirements in our two countries. The sockets are places where needed.
    Along a workshop workbench like mine I have 3 double outlets within an 8ft workbench length



    Dave
     
  5. Jul 13, 2017 #4

    anorlunda

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    I don't know about minimum distances only. My point was that you can't apply one country's rules in another country. You have to look up the local rules, whatever they are.
     
  6. Jul 13, 2017 #5

    davenn

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    totally agree :)
     
  7. Jul 13, 2017 #6

    Averagesupernova

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    The 12 foot rule between receptacles is a maximum here in the USA. There are exceptions in some hallways and etc.
     
  8. Jul 13, 2017 #7

    davenn

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    OK that is opposite to what the OP was thinking/stating where they were implying that that was the minimum
    as in they couldn't be spaced closer

    I am desperately trying to understand why there is a maximum distance ?
    what is the point ?

    I think the specific ruling needs to be stated from the USA NEC just to see if something is being lost in translation ?
     
  9. Jul 13, 2017 #8

    russ_watters

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    Convenience.
    http://www.mcgarryandmadsen.com/ins...uld_the_electrical_receptacles_be_placed.html
     
  10. Jul 13, 2017 #9

    jim hardy

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    No minimum spacing here, but an implied maximum of 12 feet
    NEC210.52
     
  11. Jul 14, 2017 #10

    davenn

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    thanks guys :)
     
  12. Jul 14, 2017 #11
    Ooh yeah, sorry guys, I meant to write maximum. Thanks for the correction.

    So is there any such rule in the UK (like the NEC210.52 for America), that talks about spacing between sockets ?

    Also please what is the book that talks about wiring regulations, british standard ?
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
  13. Jul 14, 2017 #12

    Averagesupernova

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  14. Jul 14, 2017 #13

    Bandit127

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  15. Jul 14, 2017 #14

    CWatters

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    I live in the UK.

    I don't think there is any minimum separation here. At least the electrician that wired our house had no objection to anything I proposed regarding spacing. In the UK most (but not all) houses are wired with "ring" rather than "radial" wiring. The number of sockets on each ring or radial will matter but the proximity to each other shouldn't. There are restrictions on the proximity to wet areas such as baths, showers etc

    The height of sockets and switches above the floor is controlled by Approved Document Part M of the Building Regulations to make it easier for disabled people. I think this applies to new houses. Changes to existing houses are covered by a catch all that they should not make things worse for disabled people.

    Part P makes some electrical work "notifiable" under the Building Regulations. In theory you can still do everything yourself (DIY) and pay a fee to notify Building Control but in practice it might work out cheaper to use a qualified electrician.

    I think there might be a requirement in the Building Regulations to make "adequate provision" for electrical sockets but what section that's in I've no idea.

    All the Approved Documents can be found here..

    https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200135/approved_documents

    Bandit has already linked to the 17th Edition of the wiring regs.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2017
  16. Jul 14, 2017 #15

    CWatters

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    PS Also worth noting that the Building Regulations differ in England, Scotland and Wales.
     
  17. Jul 14, 2017 #16

    dlgoff

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    The electrical home page of the Institution of Engineering Technology states they are the publisher of BS 7671:
    For those interested in having access to this standard, they provide a digital access. There is also have a Student's hub.

    @berkeman These may be good references for the Useful EE Links and Search Engines sticky.
     
  18. Jul 14, 2017 #17

    berkeman

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