Spring gun problem without a spring constant.

In summary, the ball will rise 2.3 meters when the gun is held horizontally 1.6 meters above the ground and the gun is pointed straight up.
  • #1
Alpha Russ Omega
30
0
Hello:
I'm stuck on this following problem.

A spring gun, held horizontally 1.6 meters above the ground, fires a 0.07 kilogram ball so that it lands a horizontal distance of 2.3 meters away. If the gun is pointed straight up, and the same ball is fired, how high (in meters) will it rise?

I know that: (Potential gravity) = (mass) x (gravity) x (height)
Also: (Spring potential) = (1/2) x (k) x (x^2)

I'm not really sure how to tie the two together...

Also, I'm thinking of using the conservation of energy formula:
(final kinetic + final potential gravity + final spring potential) = (initial kinetic + initial potential gravity + initial spring potential)
but I don't know how to get to the spring constant (k) with the given information in this problem.

Any help would be appreciated. :smile:
 
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  • #2
The spring has nothing to do with it, youre better off with kinematics. Figure out the initial velocity in the x for the first fire
 
  • #3
I considered the kinematics of this problem. I used two kinematics equations, one solving for time (using the height of the gun off the ground) and the other considering gravity and set them equal to each other. That's how I got velocity (approx 4 m/s). Then I applied the conservation of energy theorem for the moment right after the bullet leaves the gun (initial) right before it hits the ground (final). This is where the spring constant and the x (spring compression) come into play. Are you sure this problem can be done by completely disregarding the spring? Even though I got the velocity, I still don't know how to deal with not having the spring compression.
 
  • #4
TurdFerguson is right, this problem would be the same if you were just throwing the object, so pretend there is no spring at all.

I'm a little rusty, but isn't the pot. energy mgh?
 
  • #5
ultimateguy said:
TurdFerguson is right, this problem would be the same if you were just throwing the object, so pretend there is no spring at all.

I'm a little rusty, but isn't the pot. energy mgh?

Yup.
(gravitational potential energy) = m x g x h

I'm still stuck on this one. :frown:
I'm not sure what to do after finding the velocity.
 
  • #6
This problem was solved by finding time with a kinematic equation on the y-axis. Once that was found, I put the time into an another kinematic equation in order to find velocity on the x-axis. This velocity was used with a conservation of energy equation. So, through this final conservation equation the height was found.

Thank you for the hints! :smile:
 

1. What is the "spring gun problem without a spring constant"?

The "spring gun problem without a spring constant" is a physics problem that involves a gun or launcher that uses a spring to propel a projectile. However, in this problem, the spring constant (a measure of the stiffness of the spring) is not given, making the problem more challenging to solve.

2. Why is the spring constant important in the spring gun problem?

The spring constant plays a crucial role in the spring gun problem as it determines the force exerted by the spring on the projectile. Without knowing the spring constant, it is challenging to calculate the velocity and trajectory of the projectile.

3. How do scientists solve the spring gun problem without a spring constant?

Scientists use various methods and equations, such as Hooke's law and conservation of energy, to solve the spring gun problem without a spring constant. These methods involve manipulating the given variables and using mathematical equations to determine the unknown values.

4. What are the challenges of solving the spring gun problem without a spring constant?

The main challenge of solving the spring gun problem without a spring constant is the lack of a crucial piece of information. Without the spring constant, it is challenging to accurately calculate the force and energy of the spring, leading to potential errors in the final solution.

5. How is the spring gun problem without a spring constant relevant in the real world?

The spring gun problem without a spring constant is relevant in the real world as it mimics real-life situations where the spring constant is not always known. For example, in engineering and design, engineers often have to work with springs without knowing their exact spring constant, making this problem applicable in practical applications.

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