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Strength of induced magnetic field inside an inductor

  1. Feb 10, 2012 #1
    I am trying to make a crude coil gun. I remember that if I run current through a coil of wire, it generates a magnetic field according to the right hand rule. Will the inductance of the coil of wire greatly affect the strength of the magnetic field, or is it mainly due to the strength of the current being run through the coil?

    If possibly, can you provide me with a link to a website with more information or some equations?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 10, 2012 #2

    davenn

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    hi there

    both, but remember that the diameter (gauge) of the wire used for the inductor will determine what the max current you can put through it before it fuses.

    remember google is your friend .... here's just 1 of 1000's of links on the subject
    http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/vol_1/chpt_15/1.html
    cheers
    Dave
     
  4. Feb 11, 2012 #3
    thanks! also, lets assume I'm using a certain gauge of wire, and I'm wrapping them as close together. would making a longer coil create a stronger magnetic field? or would it only serve to make a longer acceleration area?

    if B=unI, and im wrapping them to the max tightness along the entire length, n would stay the same right?
     
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