Stress in a bending beam

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This isn't a homework question. I just have a thought I'd like an answer to. When I think of a bending beam it's obvious to me that the point on that beam which is under the most stress would be the center ( assuming equal loads on each side). my question is what is the scientific explanation for this and what formulas and principles are associated with an example like this?
 

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This isn't a homework question. I just have a thought I'd like an answer to. When I think of a bending beam it's obvious to me that the point on that beam which is under the most stress would be the center ( assuming equal loads on each side).
Why do you think this? What do you mean by "equal loads on each side"? Each side of what?

my question is what is the scientific explanation for this and what formulas and principles are associated with an example like this?
In a beam undergoing pure bending, the maximum bending stress (tensile and compressive) is actually located at the outermost fiber, as shown below.
The curved line drawn in the middle is called the neutral plane, and there is no bending stress on this plane.

http://www.foundationcoalition.org/resources/en/engr214/Chapter13/img67.png​
 
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