Superposition of Spherical Charge Distributions

  • #1

Homework Statement


http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs031.snc1/2658_1060058793594_1589658877_146788_3259033_n.jpg [Broken]


Homework Equations



e4ef2c130bca53d8ee3cb5e0056af2b1.png


The Attempt at a Solution



So I know that I should use the superposition principle, and treat it as 2 superimposed spheres of opposite charge densities. I can use Gauss's law to find the electric field of each. However I am having a little trouble figuring out how to take into account the fact that the spheres are not concentric. I also don't know whether to use the electric field inside or outside the spheres.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
gabbagabbahey
Homework Helper
Gold Member
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Homework Statement


http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs031.snc1/2658_1060058793594_1589658877_146788_3259033_n.jpg [Broken]


Homework Equations



e4ef2c130bca53d8ee3cb5e0056af2b1.png


The Attempt at a Solution



So I know that I should use the superposition principle, and treat it as 2 superimposed spheres of opposite charge densities. I can use Gauss's law to find the electric field of each. However I am having a little trouble figuring out how to take into account the fact that the spheres are not concentric. I also don't know whether to use the electric field inside or outside the spheres.

Well, you are interested in finding the electric field inside the cavity, that region lies within both the large sphere and the small sphere, so you want to use the fields inside each sphere.

What do you get for the individual fields fields, in vector form, inside the spheres?
 
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