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T.Rex soft tissue and blood cells

  1. Mar 24, 2005 #1

    marcus

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  3. Mar 24, 2005 #2
    That is some crazy stuff
     
  4. Mar 25, 2005 #3

    marcus

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    isn't it though! :smile:
    we just have to wait and see how it plays out
    I hope someone keeps track and gives an update here when more is known for certain
    they may well be disappointed and find they cannot sequence any protein
    (I do not think the possibility of finding Dna was seriously considered, just too unlikely, but there was talk of being able to analyze a protein)
     
  5. Mar 25, 2005 #4
    Classic Jurassic...


    It would be interesting to switch some Tyrannosaurus rex osteocytic or endothelial cell nuclei with some viable, fertile ostrich proto-embrionic cell nuclei inside an ostrich egg, and see what happens... :surprised

    Reference:
    http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/03/24/science/24dino.l.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2005
  6. Mar 25, 2005 #5
    Way cool, yet slightly scary.
     
  7. Mar 25, 2005 #6
    I heard about this on the news this morning. Unbelieveable, is what I first thought. Although, what an excellent new way to expand our knowledge of these creatures! I find it disgustingly interesting.:biggrin:
     
  8. Mar 25, 2005 #7

    Chronos

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    Jurassic park anyone?
     
  9. Mar 25, 2005 #8
    Lol. No kidding! :laughing:
     
  10. Mar 25, 2005 #9
    Jurassic Classic...


    It is possible to scan inside semi-fossilized bone with X-ray or CAT or some other type of magnetic imaging scanner, without actually drilling, cutting or breaking open any of the available specimens for soft tissue.

    Reference:
    http://www.harktheherald.com/module...article&sid=51031&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0
    http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40959000/jpg/_40959941_trex_pa_203.jpg.jpg
    http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40960000/jpg/_40960727_dino_science_203.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2005
  11. Mar 25, 2005 #10

    Janitor

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    I think it is somehow related to cold fusion. :rofl:

    April Fools?
     
  12. Mar 27, 2005 #11
    Stupid computer won't let me access the links. :devil: They aquired the tissue from inside the bone of the dinosaur?
     
  13. Mar 29, 2005 #12

    Phobos

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    They had an interview with Jack Horner (lead scientists in the discovery team) and others on NPR last night about this. They would be surprised to find any intact DNA or even any biological proteins after 70 million years. Even though it's "soft" tissue, it may be chemically altered after all this time. But keep your fingers crossed. Either way, they should still be able to learn a lot from this.

    Even if they find DNA, they don't expect to start cloning. You need cells for that, not just DNA fragments.

    Other interesting tidbits...
    (1) It may be possible that other fossils already on hand also have soft tissue within them. It's mainly that no one has really looked before (there's a certain extraction process that is required...not just simply cracking open bones).
    (2) Jack Horner is about to issue another paper with another (unrevealed) discovery about this fossil find (possibly related to the bone interior/soft tissue thing).
     
  14. Mar 29, 2005 #13

    Phobos

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    Yes. The bone (+ casing) was too big to transport so they broke it in half. One of the scientists collected a sample from the interior of the bone and when she did some lab work on it, she found that it was soft tissue and not totally fossilized. The fossil specimen was very well preserved overall and the sample came from the interior of a thick leg bone (extra protection).
     
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