Temperature and orbital period

In summary, the conversation is discussing a question about the orbital period of an asteroid with an equilibrium temperature of 200 K. The question also mentions considerations from a previous question regarding the Earth's radius, solar constant, and planetary albedo. The conversation suggests considering the source of power and units of power before determining the asteroid's orbital period.
  • #1
rodrigues
2
0
Hi everyone,

was hoping someone could help me to answer a question:

an ateroid has an equilibrium temperature measured as 200 K. What is the object's orbital period around the Sun?

That is the exact wording of that particular question and that's why I am a little stumped.. it also says to base it upon your considerations in question #4, which reads

assuming the Earth's radius is 637 km, the solar constant is 1370 w/m2, and our planetary albedo is 0.31, then:
(a) determine total power entering Earth's atmosphere
(b) the total power that would be asborbed in the absence of an atmosphere
© surface temperature assuming it radiated into space all the energy it absorbed
 
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  • #2
rodrigues said:
an ateroid has an equilibrium temperature measured as 200 K. What is the object's orbital period around the Sun?

You need to show some work before we can help you. What determines the temperature of an orbiting body? Disregard complicated atmospheric effects. What simple approximation might you make to describe its energy output?


assuming the Earth's radius is 637 km, the solar constant is 1370 w/m2, and our planetary albedo is 0.31, then:
(a) determine total power entering Earth's atmosphere
(b) the total power that would be asborbed in the absence of an atmosphere
© surface temperature assuming it radiated into space all the energy it absorbed

Same here, you need to show some work. What are the units of power? What is the source of the power?
 
  • #3
oops posted too soon, sec let me finish it
 
  • #4
nvm got it :)
 
Last edited:
  • #5
I do hope that the radius of the Earth is 6370 km
 

Related to Temperature and orbital period

1. What is the relationship between temperature and orbital period?

The relationship between temperature and orbital period depends on the distance between an object and its star. The closer an object is to its star, the shorter its orbital period and the higher its temperature. Conversely, the farther an object is from its star, the longer its orbital period and the lower its temperature.

2. How does the temperature of a planet affect its orbital period?

The temperature of a planet can affect its orbital period through the process of thermal expansion. When a planet's temperature increases, its volume also increases, causing it to move farther away from its star. This results in a longer orbital period for the planet.

3. Can temperature and orbital period impact habitability of a planet?

Yes, temperature and orbital period can significantly impact the habitability of a planet. A planet's temperature must be within a certain range to support life, and its orbital period must be stable enough to maintain a consistent climate. If a planet's temperature is too extreme or its orbital period is too short or long, it may not be suitable for life to thrive.

4. How do scientists measure the temperature and orbital period of planets?

Scientists can measure the temperature and orbital period of planets using various methods, such as observing the planet's transit across its star, measuring its radiation, or studying its reflected light. They can also use mathematical models to calculate these values based on the planet's distance from its star and its composition.

5. Can temperature and orbital period vary within a planetary system?

Yes, temperature and orbital period can vary within a planetary system. This can be due to differences in the distance between planets and their star, the size and composition of the planets, and the effects of other celestial bodies in the system. As a result, planets within the same system may have different temperatures and orbital periods.

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