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Theory of Machines (Mechanical Engineering) question

  1. Nov 2, 2013 #1
    Hello all;

    I have been thinking about something for some time and could not find it through the internet so i decided to ask this to you.

    In theory of machines course, there is lambda (degree of freedom of space) in the degree of freedom of mechanism formula. As you already know, lambda should be constant throughout the mechanism in order to use the formula. Here is my question;

    How do you know that lambda is constant or not? I cannot figure that out and i would appreciate very much if you gave me some examples. Thank you all for your interest.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 2, 2013 #2

    mfb

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    Can you check if the number of degrees of freedom is the same all the time?
     
  4. Nov 2, 2013 #3
    I couldnot understand you
     
  5. Nov 2, 2013 #4

    mfb

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    How do you determine lambda?
    Do this for all possible things that will happen. Is the result the same everywhere?
     
  6. Nov 2, 2013 #5
    Could you please give an example mechanism where lambda is not constant?
     
  7. Nov 2, 2013 #6

    mfb

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    I guess some joint can get fixed or something like that. But then I would split the analysis in two parts, both with different (but constant) lambda.
     
  8. Nov 2, 2013 #7
    And then you would add their degrees of freedoms and find the degree of freedom of the whole mechanism?
     
  9. Nov 2, 2013 #8

    mfb

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    No, why? If I can analyze both parts, it is fine.
     
  10. Nov 3, 2013 #9
    OK, thanks.
     
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