Thermal physics: work and heat

In summary, the conversation discusses the amount of heat added to a cup of water based on its change in temperature. It is a trick question as there is no heat added since heat is a spontaneous process that flows from a hot object to a cold object. The question prompts further inquiry into where the heat may have flowed in this specific scenario.
  • #1
Benzoate
422
0
1. Homework Statement


A cup containing 200 grams of H20 is siting on your dining room table . After carefully measuring its temperature to be 20 degree celsuis , y ou leave the room. Returning ten minutes later, you meaure its temperature again and find that it is now 25 degree celsuis. What can you conclude about the amount of heat added to water?(hint: this is a trick question)
2. Homework Equations



3. The Attempt at a Solution

My response to this question was that there is no heat added or heat is equal to zero since heat is a spontaneous process where heat flows from a hot object to a cold object. Even though there is a temperature difference involved in this process, The temperature increases rather than decreases
 
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  • #2
Benzoate said:
1. Homework Statement

A cup containing 200 grams of H20 is siting on your dining room table . After carefully measuring its temperature to be 20 degree celsuis , y ou leave the room. Returning ten minutes later, you meaure its temperature again and find that it is now 25 degree celsuis. What can you conclude about the amount of heat added to water?(hint: this is a trick question)
2. Homework Equations

3. The Attempt at a Solution

My response to this question was that there is no heat added or heat is equal to zero since heat is a spontaneous process where heat flows from a hot object to a cold object. Even though there is a temperature difference involved in this process, The temperature increases rather than decreases

I would be very much interested to know from where to where the heat flowed in this case, since you've tantalizingly left out that part.
 
Last edited:
  • #3
Is it in the sun?
 

Related to Thermal physics: work and heat

1. What is thermal physics?

Thermal physics is the branch of physics that studies the relationship between heat, temperature, and energy. It involves understanding the behavior of particles at the atomic and molecular level, and how they interact with each other to produce heat and work.

2. What is the difference between work and heat?

Work and heat are both forms of energy transfer, but they differ in how they are transferred. Work is the energy transferred when a force acts on an object and causes it to move. Heat, on the other hand, is the energy transferred due to a difference in temperature between two objects.

3. What is the first law of thermodynamics?

The first law of thermodynamics is also known as the law of conservation of energy. It states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transferred or converted from one form to another. This means that the total energy of a closed system remains constant.

4. How is thermal energy measured?

Thermal energy is measured in units of joules (J) in the SI system. It is often measured using a thermometer, which measures the average kinetic energy of particles in a substance. Another common unit of measurement for thermal energy is the calorie (cal), which is defined as the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 degree Celsius.

5. How does thermal physics relate to everyday life?

Thermal physics has many practical applications in everyday life. It helps us understand how heat is transferred and how different materials respond to changes in temperature. This knowledge is crucial for designing and improving everyday objects such as heaters, refrigerators, and air conditioners. It also plays a crucial role in fields such as meteorology, engineering, and medicine.

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