Tips for preparing for the AP physics C mechanics exam

In summary, the student is worried about their ability to do well in their first college physics course if they do not do well on the AP calc ab exam. They are also worried about their ability to do well on the mechanics component of their engineering major if they do not do well on the AP test.
  • #1
pakmingki
93
1
i have about 6 weeks to study, so, what should do?
what prep books would you guys reccomend?
how much time should i spend prepping everyday?
 
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  • #2
I'm taking the same test in a few weeks. My class is preparing just by doing practice problems (exam questions from previous tests).

Just out of curiosity, what are you hoping to score?
 
  • #3
im hoping to score a 5. I've been improving alot, and i think with a lot of practice, i can succeed.
 
  • #4
I'll be hoping for a 5, as long as I don't screw up on springs. Hah-- screw...spring... :P Sorry bad joke.

But yeah, springs ALWAYS give me problems for some reason. Probably because I had the flu the week we went over them, and never really bothered to learn them properly.

I really don't know whether or not I want to take it (or at least use my test for credits at college), because I'll be majoring in Mech. Eng. Physics is pretty much the basis for my major, and I don't want to have a weak foundation. I'm afraid that my first college Physics course might be more than just what I needed for the AP test, and then I'll start off behind.

Does anyone have input on this?
 
  • #5
yea, i am a bit worried about that, and not just about physics. I am taking the ap calc ab exam, and a 5 on that (for my college) allows me to skip ahead to the 3rd quarter of calculus, and I am pretty sure if i do that, ill start off way behind, cause skipping the 2nd quarter of college calc would mean skipping all the stuff on series and maclaurin/taylor stuff.

But honeslty, i really don't think you will be behind in physics. In the college sequence for engineernig majors, the first physics course is the mechanics component, and if you get a good enough score on the AP exam, you will most likely just start off on the 2nd component, which is E and M. If you can do well on the AP test, i think you will have a pretty good foundation for EM.
 

1. What topics should I focus on when preparing for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam?

The AP Physics C Mechanics exam will cover topics such as kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, work, energy, and power, rotational motion, and oscillations. It is important to have a strong understanding of these topics and be able to apply them to problem-solving scenarios.

2. How much time should I dedicate to studying for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam?

The amount of time you should dedicate to studying for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam will vary based on your individual learning style and level of understanding. However, it is recommended to spend at least 2-3 hours per week reviewing material, practicing problems, and taking practice exams leading up to the exam date.

3. Are there any specific study strategies that can help me prepare for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam?

Some effective study strategies for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam include creating a study schedule, reviewing class notes and textbook material, practicing with past exams and problem sets, and seeking help from teachers or tutors when needed. It is also important to actively engage with the material and continuously assess your understanding.

4. What are some common mistakes to avoid when studying for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam?

Some common mistakes to avoid when studying for the AP Physics C Mechanics exam include not starting early enough, neglecting to review fundamental concepts, and relying solely on memorization rather than understanding. It is also important to not get discouraged by difficult problems and to seek help when needed.

5. How can I best prepare for the free-response portion of the AP Physics C Mechanics exam?

The free-response portion of the AP Physics C Mechanics exam will require you to apply your knowledge to solve problems and explain concepts. To prepare, it is important to practice with past free-response questions and become familiar with the format and types of questions that may be asked. It is also helpful to review any common mistakes or misconceptions that may arise in this section.

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