To add more ions, but not get any precipitate?

  • Thread starter angela107
  • Start date
  • #1
angela107
35
2
TL;DR Summary
I'm given an equilibrium, what can I do if I wanted to add more silver ions and not get more precipitate?
Here's an image of the equilibrium
Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 5.50.38 PM.png

I'm not sure how that's possible, but I'm thinking maybe I could remove Cl- ion so that the Ag+ ions don't have much to combine with.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Borek
Mentor
29,169
3,845
Not sure what you really mean. Yes, you are limited by the solubility and you can't add more Ag+ than defined by the concentration of Cl-. Yes, removing Cl- will allow adding more Ag+. But I have a feeling that can be only tangential to what you are really trying to achieve/solve/answer.
 
  • #3
DrStupid
2,167
501
I'm thinking maybe I could remove Cl- ion

You can't just remove ions - no matter how you plan to do that in practice (some details would be helpful). You need to replace them with other ions in order to keep the solution electrically neutral and it makes a difference if you replace Cl- with I- or with NO3- (for example).
 
  • #4
angela107
35
2
Not sure what you really mean. Yes, you are limited by the solubility and you can't add more Ag+ than defined by the concentration of Cl-. Yes, removing Cl- will allow adding more Ag+. But I have a feeling that can be only tangential to what you are really trying to achieve/solve/answer.
I wasn't told to perform an action that could disrupt the equilibrium, I just need to find a way to add ions by any means necessary as long as I don't produce any precipitate. Removing Cl- ions could do the job...
 
  • #5
DrStupid
2,167
501
I just need to find a way to add ions by any means necessary as long as I don't produce any precipitate.

Does that mean you may also add something else in addition to Ag+ (e.g. NH3)?

Removing Cl- ions could do the job...

Yes it could. But it matters how you do it. How do you plan to remove Cl- ions?
 
  • #6
angela107
35
2
Does that mean you may also add something else in addition to Ag+ (e.g. NH3)?



Yes it could. But it matters how you do it. How do you plan to remove Cl- ions?
If I remove the Cl- ions, I would have to replace them with something else, as long as there is no precipitate involved.
 
  • #7
DrStupid
2,167
501
If I remove the Cl- ions, I would have to replace them with something else, as long as there is no precipitate involved.

Yes, but what would you replace them with and how would you do that in practice? I have no clear picture of what you want to do and why.
 
  • #8
chemisttree
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Gold Member
3,712
704
You could pass the solution through an anion exchange resin charged with the anion you want to add in place of Cl-. If it’s nitrate, charge the resin with ammonium nitrate, rinse well and then pass the AgCl solution through and exchange the Cl- with NO3-. Now you have a solution of AgNO3. You have changed the equilibrium because [Cl-] is essentially zero.

Add all the Ag+ you want to at that point (as the nitrate, of course).

I have no idea why you would want to do this...
 
  • Like
Likes jim mcnamara
  • #9
jim mcnamara
Mentor
4,690
3,633
This sounds like a homework problem, without the included problem statement...
@angela107 is there a problem statement you could include?
 

Suggested for: To add more ions, but not get any precipitate?

  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
389
Replies
5
Views
85
  • Last Post
Replies
11
Views
150
Replies
2
Views
599
Replies
6
Views
3K
Replies
22
Views
1K
Replies
7
Views
387
  • Last Post
2
Replies
47
Views
2K
Top