To add more ions, but not get any precipitate?

  • Thread starter angela107
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In summary: You could try replacing Cl- with NH3 and see if that changes the equilibrium.I have no idea why you would want to do this...This sounds like a homework problem, without the included problem statement...@angela107 is there a problem statement you could include?
  • #1
angela107
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I'm given an equilibrium, what can I do if I wanted to add more silver ions and not get more precipitate?
Here's an image of the equilibrium
Screen Shot 2020-06-10 at 5.50.38 PM.png

I'm not sure how that's possible, but I'm thinking maybe I could remove Cl- ion so that the Ag+ ions don't have much to combine with.
 
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  • #2
Not sure what you really mean. Yes, you are limited by the solubility and you can't add more Ag+ than defined by the concentration of Cl-. Yes, removing Cl- will allow adding more Ag+. But I have a feeling that can be only tangential to what you are really trying to achieve/solve/answer.
 
  • #3
angela107 said:
I'm thinking maybe I could remove Cl- ion

You can't just remove ions - no matter how you plan to do that in practice (some details would be helpful). You need to replace them with other ions in order to keep the solution electrically neutral and it makes a difference if you replace Cl- with I- or with NO3- (for example).
 
  • #4
Borek said:
Not sure what you really mean. Yes, you are limited by the solubility and you can't add more Ag+ than defined by the concentration of Cl-. Yes, removing Cl- will allow adding more Ag+. But I have a feeling that can be only tangential to what you are really trying to achieve/solve/answer.
I wasn't told to perform an action that could disrupt the equilibrium, I just need to find a way to add ions by any means necessary as long as I don't produce any precipitate. Removing Cl- ions could do the job...
 
  • #5
angela107 said:
I just need to find a way to add ions by any means necessary as long as I don't produce any precipitate.

Does that mean you may also add something else in addition to Ag+ (e.g. NH3)?

angela107 said:
Removing Cl- ions could do the job...

Yes it could. But it matters how you do it. How do you plan to remove Cl- ions?
 
  • #6
DrStupid said:
Does that mean you may also add something else in addition to Ag+ (e.g. NH3)?
Yes it could. But it matters how you do it. How do you plan to remove Cl- ions?
If I remove the Cl- ions, I would have to replace them with something else, as long as there is no precipitate involved.
 
  • #7
angela107 said:
If I remove the Cl- ions, I would have to replace them with something else, as long as there is no precipitate involved.

Yes, but what would you replace them with and how would you do that in practice? I have no clear picture of what you want to do and why.
 
  • #8
You could pass the solution through an anion exchange resin charged with the anion you want to add in place of Cl-. If it’s nitrate, charge the resin with ammonium nitrate, rinse well and then pass the AgCl solution through and exchange the Cl- with NO3-. Now you have a solution of AgNO3. You have changed the equilibrium because [Cl-] is essentially zero.

Add all the Ag+ you want to at that point (as the nitrate, of course).

I have no idea why you would want to do this...
 
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  • #9
This sounds like a homework problem, without the included problem statement...
@angela107 is there a problem statement you could include?
 

Related to To add more ions, but not get any precipitate?

1. How do I add more ions without getting any precipitate?

One way to add more ions without getting any precipitate is to gradually increase the concentration of the ion solution. This allows for a slower reaction and can prevent the formation of a precipitate.

2. What is the ideal concentration for adding more ions without getting any precipitate?

The ideal concentration for adding more ions without getting any precipitate may vary depending on the specific ions and solutions being used. It is important to conduct experiments and observe the reaction to determine the ideal concentration for your particular situation.

3. Can temperature affect the formation of a precipitate when adding more ions?

Yes, temperature can play a role in the formation of a precipitate when adding more ions. Higher temperatures can increase the rate of a reaction, potentially resulting in a precipitate forming more quickly. It is important to monitor and control the temperature when adding more ions to prevent the formation of a precipitate.

4. What are some techniques for preventing the formation of a precipitate when adding more ions?

Some techniques for preventing the formation of a precipitate when adding more ions include using a slow and gradual addition of the ion solution, controlling the temperature, and using a solvent that is compatible with both solutions.

5. Is it possible to add too many ions and cause a precipitate to form?

Yes, it is possible to add too many ions and cause a precipitate to form. This can occur if the concentration of the ion solution is too high or if the rate of addition is too fast. It is important to carefully monitor and control the addition of ions to prevent the formation of a precipitate.

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