Toy Airplane Flying: Lift Force vs. Reaction Force

In summary, the lift force is not the same as the reaction force, but it is equal to the vertical component of the centripetal force and weight force of the airplane.
  • #1
beefcake466
9
0
Hi I've got a question concerning a previous question I've done. A person is holding a toy airplane which flys in the air with a constant radius.

is the lift force the same as reaction force?

is it equal to the vertical component of the centripetal force and weight force of the airplane?
 
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  • #2
beefcake466 said:
Hi I've got a question concerning a previous question I've done. A person is holding a toy airplane which flys in the air with a constant radius.

is the lift force the same as reaction force?

is it equal to the vertical component of the centripetal force and weight force of the airplane?
Assuming the plane is flying in a horizontal circle of constant radius, the lift force is equal to the weight force plus the vertical component of the tension force in the cord. The centripetal force is the horizontal component of the tension force.
 
  • #3



Hello,

Thank you for reaching out with your question. I can provide some insight into the concept of lift force and reaction force in relation to toy airplane flying.

Firstly, the lift force and reaction force are not the same. The lift force is the force that acts perpendicular to the direction of motion of the airplane and is responsible for keeping the airplane in the air. On the other hand, the reaction force is the force that acts in the opposite direction to the lift force and is responsible for keeping the airplane from falling.

Secondly, the lift force is not equal to the vertical component of the centripetal force and weight force of the airplane. The lift force is a result of the difference in air pressure above and below the wings of the airplane, while the weight force is a result of the gravitational pull of the Earth on the airplane. The vertical component of the centripetal force is a result of the airplane's circular motion.

In summary, the lift force and reaction force are not the same and are not equal to the vertical component of the centripetal force and weight force of the airplane. I hope this helps clarify your understanding. Please let me know if you have any further questions.

Best,
 

Related to Toy Airplane Flying: Lift Force vs. Reaction Force

What is lift force?

Lift force is the upward force that allows an object, such as a toy airplane, to stay in the air. It is created by the difference in air pressure above and below the wings of the airplane.

What is reaction force?

Reaction force is the force that is equal and opposite to the lift force. It is created by the air being pushed downward by the wings of the airplane.

How do lift force and reaction force work together to keep a toy airplane flying?

Lift force and reaction force work together in a continuous cycle to keep a toy airplane flying. The wings of the airplane create lift force, which pushes the air downward and creates reaction force. This reaction force then pushes the airplane upward, allowing it to continue flying.

What factors affect the amount of lift force and reaction force in toy airplane flying?

The amount of lift force and reaction force in toy airplane flying can be affected by several factors, including the shape and size of the wings, the speed of the airplane, the angle of the wings, and the density of the air.

How does the concept of lift force and reaction force apply to real airplanes?

The concept of lift force and reaction force also applies to real airplanes. However, real airplanes use more complex designs, such as flaps and ailerons, to control and manipulate these forces for more efficient and controlled flight.

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