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Two line charges lie in the XY plane

  1. Jan 21, 2013 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Line A extends from (2,2, 0) to (-2, 2, 0) and line B extends from (2, -2, 0) to (-2, -2, 0). Each has a linear charge density ρl = 1 nC / m. You want to calculate the magnitude and direction of the electric field due to the two line charges for all points on the z-axis.

    a.) Sketch the charge distribution, and set up the integrals you need in order to
    solve this problem. Indicate the vector R for each line charge on your plot,
    and determine expressions for R and R3

    b.) Prove that the magnitude of the electric field in the x and y directions is
    zero.

    2. Relevant equations
    See pdf attachment.

    3. The attempt at a solution
    So far I've tried doing the integration technique shown in the attached pdf (this was a class example) and I am not quite sure if that's correct since there are no Z components. Also this problem is with two line charges and not one... so I guess I am basically having trouble finding out where to start? Any help is appreciated.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 21, 2013 #2

    haruspex

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    What do you see as the differences between the class example and the present problem? What can you do to relate the one to the other?
     
  4. Jan 21, 2013 #3
    I'm guessing that I could do that formula for each line and then just sum up their total e-fields?
     
  5. Jan 21, 2013 #4

    haruspex

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    Yes. And the other difference is? (You mentioned a concern regarding z components.)
     
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