Type 2 Projectiles TEST TOMMOROW

In summary, the conversation is about a person who is struggling with a certain type of projectile problem involving a gymnast's flip. They are seeking help to determine the initial velocity and maximum height of the flip. The person mentions knowing some formulas but not understanding how to apply them in this particular problem. They eventually figure out the solution on their own and thank the others for trying to help.
  • #1
3dsmax
okay i know how do do type one and type 3 projectiles but there is this certain kind of type 2 that i can't figure out. if the problem gives me a initial velocity and an angle of 30 degrees i am okay. BUT for this kind i don't know what to do:

"A gymnast becomes a projectile by doing a flip that gives here a horizontal range of 1.80 neters. If she took off at an angle of 60.0 degrees, determine:
1. initial velocity
2. the maximum height that she attains

PLEASE HELP ME
i have a test tommorow and got to figure this out. Any help would be appreciated.incase your wondering i know a few formulas like y =x tan(theta) - gx^2/ 2vi^2cos^2 (theta), also vf^2=vi^2 +2ax, and all the derivitives, I just don't have any clue on how to do this one.
 
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  • #3
i don't know what voy and vox means, i guess i haven't learned that yet, so how can i do it without knowledge of that.
 
  • #4
3dsmax said:
i don't know what voy and vox means, i guess i haven't learned that yet, so how can i do it without knowledge of that.

If you set up an xy coordinate system, then Vox = Vo * cos(theta), and Voy = Vo * sin(theta) are the components of the initial velocity Vo along the x and y axis, respectively.
 
  • #5
oh i figured it out one my own. I competely forgot about the formula:
Range = Vi^2 sin2(theta)/g

Well thanks for trying to help me i appreciate it. Now that i got this one of the mods can delete this thread.
 

Related to Type 2 Projectiles TEST TOMMOROW

What is a Type 2 Projectile?

A Type 2 Projectile is a type of object or particle that is launched or thrown with a specific initial velocity and angle. It follows a parabolic trajectory and is affected by gravity, air resistance, and other external factors.

How is the motion of a Type 2 Projectile calculated?

The motion of a Type 2 Projectile can be calculated using the equations of motion, including the projectile's initial velocity, angle of launch, and the acceleration due to gravity. These calculations can be done using mathematical formulas or through computer simulations.

What are some examples of Type 2 Projectiles?

Some common examples of Type 2 Projectiles include a baseball being thrown, a cannonball being fired, a basketball being shot, or a rocket being launched. These objects all follow a parabolic trajectory when launched with a specific initial velocity and angle.

How does air resistance affect the motion of a Type 2 Projectile?

Air resistance is a force that opposes the motion of a projectile through the air. It can slow down the projectile and cause it to deviate from its expected trajectory. The amount of air resistance depends on the shape and size of the projectile, as well as the speed at which it is traveling.

What are some real-world applications of studying Type 2 Projectiles?

The study of Type 2 Projectiles is important in fields such as engineering, physics, and sports. It helps us understand the motion of objects and how they are affected by external forces. This knowledge is used in designing projectiles such as missiles and rockets, as well as in sports such as football and basketball to improve performance and accuracy.

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