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Unfrozen freezy pops a bewitched frozen treat!

  1. Oct 29, 2007 #1
    This is quite the conundrum, and I have yet to talk to anyone with even a sensible answer.

    I have a freezer that is extremely cold. Things freeze very quickly, and come out completely frozen. Except freezy pops. ie, "Flavor Ice".

    Now at first it may just seem that for some reason the Flavor Ice do not freeze at the temperature of the freezer...HOWEVER...

    Out of the box of thirty or so, completely randomly, certain ones will freeze and other ones won't. and they can be right next to each other! For example, today, after being in the freezer for 4 days, I went to get a flavor ice and only 1 out of the 30 was frozen! And the really weird thing is that it is not like mush frozen. It is rock solid, while the rest are completely in liquid state.

    Even after 3 or 4 weeks there can be some unfrozen freezy pops. It doesn't make any sense!

    Can someone explain!?!
    Eventually all freezy pops freeze, it seems to be completely random and not based on color, and they freeze next to each other, while others are completely unfrozen.

  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 29, 2007 #2
  4. Oct 29, 2007 #3
    Aw that was one more thing I wanted to add, agitating them does not cause them to freeze instantly, as would a supercooled object.

  5. Oct 30, 2007 #4
    That is strange. My first thoughts are that something went wrong in manufacturing, like too much of a a certain additive that may have a very high freezing point. MMmmm.... stumps me.
    And I'm not so sure I would eat them.
    I would call the manufacturer, explain the situation and see what they have to say.
  6. Oct 30, 2007 #5


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    Science Advisor

    Ethylene glycol has been found in a lot of Chinese made foods. This sure sounds like a case of anti-freeze doing its job.

    Then again, maybe you have a warm spot in your freezer. Have you tried moving the box around to different locations?
  7. Oct 30, 2007 #6


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    Gold Member

    This sounds like a perfect opportunity for some rigorous experimentation.
    Set up the experiment with fixed times, locations, numbers etc.
    I'd be particularly interested in seeing how the freezies are stacked and which ones froze.
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