USB Type-C vs Thunderbolt: Which is faster and better for data transfer?

  • Thread starter Stonestreecty
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In summary, the new iPPs only support USB2.0 on the charging cable supplied with them. This may have been done to balance the size of the power conductors needed with their manic drive for "thin" and/or to allow for a longer cable. USB3.x and TB3 require more data lines, leading to bulkier cables, and can have issues with longer cables.
  • #1
Stonestreecty
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TL;DR Summary
For my iPad Pro (1st generation), USB Type-C or Thunderbolt port is better?
Hi,
I have an iPad Pro (1st generation) with what appears to be a USB type-C port. Period. No other ports, which I’ve been trying to get used for for more than a year now, but that’s not my current issue.
Here’s what is the issue:
I figure it out based on Identify USB Types by Its Appearances Support, still confused, I simply want to know which is faster/better, my USB Type-C port or a Thunderbolt port?
I assume there is an appropriate adapter if the answer is Thunderbolt? :oldconfused:
 
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  • #2
To get the maximum speed of any port it needs to be native on your device and wired into the motherboard. If you have a port capable of say 1GB transfer rate, and you plug an adapter to it that is natively 10GB transfer rate, then that adapter still plugs into the 1GB port so you will only get 1GB as that is your bottleneck.

I would just buy devices that are compatible with whatever port you currently have.

Thunderbolt is technically faster but you won't see the benefit without it having direct access to your motherboard.
 
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Likes DaveE, berkeman and phinds
  • #3
True.

When gathering gear, people need to consider the protocols and abilities of not only the device's port, but also the cables', hub's/dock's/..., and those of the target device. various cables, each optimized for different chores. While power/charing cables can be long, high speed data transfer protocols (read: TB3, USB3.1.x) abhor long cables.

It appears that Apple chose to only support USB2.0 on the charging cable supplied with the new iPPs. It was, perhaps, done to balance the size of the power conductors needed with their manic drive for "thin" and/or to allow for a longer cable. USB3.x and TB3 require more data lines, leading to bulkier cables, and can have issues with longer cables.
 

Related to USB Type-C vs Thunderbolt: Which is faster and better for data transfer?

1. What is the difference between USB Type-C and Thunderbolt?

USB Type-C and Thunderbolt are two different types of connectors that are used for data transfer and charging. USB Type-C is a newer standard and is designed for universal use, while Thunderbolt is a proprietary technology developed by Intel.

2. Which one is faster, USB Type-C or Thunderbolt?

Thunderbolt is generally faster than USB Type-C. Thunderbolt 3 has a maximum speed of 40 Gbps, while USB Type-C has a maximum speed of 10 Gbps. However, the speed also depends on the devices and cables being used.

3. Are USB Type-C and Thunderbolt compatible with each other?

Yes, USB Type-C and Thunderbolt are compatible with each other. Thunderbolt 3 uses the same physical connector as USB Type-C, so you can use a Thunderbolt 3 device with a USB Type-C port and vice versa. However, the speed will be limited to the slower device.

4. Can I use a USB Type-C device with a Thunderbolt port?

Yes, you can use a USB Type-C device with a Thunderbolt port. However, the device will only function as a USB device and will not be able to take advantage of the higher speeds and capabilities of Thunderbolt.

5. Which one should I choose, USB Type-C or Thunderbolt?

It depends on your needs. If you need faster data transfer speeds and the ability to connect high-performance devices, Thunderbolt would be the better choice. If you are looking for a universal connector for charging and data transfer, USB Type-C would be more suitable. Additionally, Thunderbolt ports are more expensive and not as widely available as USB Type-C ports.

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