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Velocity at a time t

  1. May 22, 2006 #1
    Sir,
    The initial velocity of the particle is u (at t=0) and the acceleration f is given by at. What is the velocity of the particle at a time t?
    My answer is v = u + at^2 but the book answer is v = u + (at^2)/2. Which is right?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 22, 2006 #2

    Hootenanny

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    The book, if you showed your work perhaps, we could point out your error.

    ~H
     
  4. May 22, 2006 #3
    As Hoot stated, the book is right. Perhaps Amith, you are directly substituting the value of acceleration directly into v = u + at
    But in this case acceleration is not constant but time variant (linearly).
    So you need to take average acceleration which is ........

    And please show your working or thoughts. I have often noticed in your earlier posts that you seldom show any working at all . We don't do other people's homework, we merely help.

    Arun
     
  5. May 22, 2006 #4

    Hootenanny

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    Alternatively, Calculus could be used.

    ~H
     
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