• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products Here!

Velocity at a time t

  • Thread starter Amith2006
  • Start date
  • #1
427
2
Sir,
The initial velocity of the particle is u (at t=0) and the acceleration f is given by at. What is the velocity of the particle at a time t?
My answer is v = u + at^2 but the book answer is v = u + (at^2)/2. Which is right?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Hootenanny
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
9,622
6
The book, if you showed your work perhaps, we could point out your error.

~H
 
  • #3
590
0
As Hoot stated, the book is right. Perhaps Amith, you are directly substituting the value of acceleration directly into v = u + at
But in this case acceleration is not constant but time variant (linearly).
So you need to take average acceleration which is ........

And please show your working or thoughts. I have often noticed in your earlier posts that you seldom show any working at all . We don't do other people's homework, we merely help.

Arun
 
  • #4
Hootenanny
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
9,622
6
Alternatively, Calculus could be used.

~H
 

Related Threads for: Velocity at a time t

Replies
8
Views
2K
Replies
18
Views
602
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
924
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
747
Replies
9
Views
8K
Top