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Voltage Stabilizer in car or home

  1. Oct 10, 2011 #1
    hye... i new user (forumer)... help me....

    1) -what is voltage stabilizer?
    -application
    -effect
    - DIY circuit

    2) fuse for voltage stabilizer?
    why use fuse for car = 20A
    motor = 10 A
    home = 13A

    tqvm....
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 10, 2011 #2

    davenn

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    A fuse isnt a voltage stabiliser, a fuse is over current protection.

    2 common forms of voltage stabilisation are a zener diode or a voltage regulator chip
    have a look at that link below for zener use

    http://www.reuk.co.uk/Zener-Diode-Voltage-Regulator.htm" [Broken]

    You have made no mention of what sort of voltage levels you want to stabilise, that would help so we can help you further :)

    Do a wikipedia search on linear voltage regulators there's a good page of info

    cheers
    Dave
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  4. Oct 10, 2011 #3
    fuse in voltage stabilizer? use 10A or ???
     
  5. Oct 10, 2011 #4

    davenn

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    you use a fuse rating in a circuit appropriate for what current is being drawn
    you still havent answered my question concerning voltages

    to help you I need to know ....

    1) input voltage to the stabiliser circuit?
    2) stabilised output voltage needed for the equipment being supplied?
    3) how much current does the equipment draw(need) ?

    I say again ... a fuse DOES NOT stabilise voltage, a fuse is over current protection.



    cheers
    Dave
     
  6. Oct 10, 2011 #5

    ooh...
    1) input voltage = 12V
    2) output voltage = 12V
    3) current? i dont know...

    to protect voltage stabilizer, use fuse 10A or ???
     
  7. Oct 11, 2011 #6

    davenn

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    please .... if you dont know the current being used there is no way anyone can tell you
    what the correct size of fuse to use

    Dave
     
  8. Oct 11, 2011 #7
    voltage stabilizer use at battery car.. for car the current is ?? fuse support for car ???
     
  9. Oct 11, 2011 #8

    davenn

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    What is the stabilised voltage being used to supply ?

    you are going to have power coming off the battery through the stabiliser circuit then to what ??
    You need to give all the information else its very difficult for me to help you

    cheers
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2011
  10. Oct 11, 2011 #9

    sophiecentaur

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    A fuse is there to prevent 'too much' current flowing in a circuit. It is a last ditch control to stop components and wires actually melting. Until you specify what wire gauge and what other components may need protection then there is no answer to your fuse question.

    To know what voltage stabiliser you need, you must decide the supply voltage, what volts you need and, for a current controlled stabiliser, what range of current it needs to supply. Do you want it to 'current limit' or to 'shut down' when the current demand is too high?

    There are off the shelf units or designs to achieve almost anything you are every likely to need. But first you must ask the right question. (Sounds like some whacky adventure game but you know what I mean)
     
  11. Oct 11, 2011 #10

    davenn

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    hey sophiecentaur

    as you can probably tell I'm having a really difficult time getting any helpful info out of him/her, just a tad frustrating when doing what I can to help

    Dave
     
  12. Oct 11, 2011 #11

    sophiecentaur

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    Dave
    The Q&A method just doesn't work well at this level. I just don't think it's fashionable any more to pick up a book and hack through a whole chapter to find what they want so they try to 'get by' asking loads of undirected questions.
    I can sympathise, as we've all 'been there', but when I was a lad, there was no equivalent to the Internet and you just had to make the effort on your own.
    I blame the media and a lot of rubbish teaching methods that suggest that anyone can do anything with no effort.
    Ranting finished.
     
  13. Oct 12, 2011 #12
    One method of voltage stabilization for AC voltages is to use a resonant transformer.

    There are 120 and 240 volt 50 amp units using an alternative approach that requires much less copper and iron, used in motor homes. A microcontroller senses line voltage and changes the taps of an autotransformer by 5 and 12%.
     
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