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Whenever you hold rode A, you don't get electricuted

  1. Jul 25, 2006 #1
    I was wondering, whenever you hold rode A, you don't get electricuted, you have to hold both of the rods in order to get electricuted. Why?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 26, 2006 #2

    Danger

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    It depends upon what sort of circuit you're talking about. If you hold the hot side (black wire/gold connector) of a 120 VAC circuit, and are grounded in any way, you're toast. If you're holding the 'system neutral' (white wire/silver connector), you should be okay. Your can play with the green wire all that you want to, because it is a direct ground.
    This is not to say that you should ever touch any part of a live circuit. Don't, under any circumstances. There's always the possibility that the thing isn't wired properly. Pull the breaker first, and test to make sure that you got the right one.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2006
  4. Jul 26, 2006 #3
    What my question is WHY do I get electricuted if I hold the hot side (black wire/gold connector) of a 120 VAC circuit, and am grounded in any way? I mean how does the electricity know that ground is on the other side? Am I neutral medium by which it can pass if it there is an attractor on the other side? B/c If am standing on a wood, I don't get electricuted, b/w wood is not a good conductor. right?
     
  5. Jul 26, 2006 #4

    Danger

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    While wood isn't considered a good conductor, it isn't a perfect insulator either. Don't count on it saving you.
    Electrical distribution grids use the Earth as the return path for their circuits, the same way that a car manufacturer uses the body/chassis. That is the white wire. If you grab the black one, therefore, you are closing the circuit back to the generator. The white (system neutral) is actually a ground. The green ground is a backup for full safety. When you look at a lamp socket, for instance, you'll see that the white wire is the one that's connected to the threaded section, while the black goes to the base. That's so that accidental contact with the outside of the socket won't involve the hot side.
     
  6. Jul 26, 2006 #5
    There is a huge potential difference between the hot electrode and ground. By touching the hot end and grounding yourself, you just provided a conducting path (your body) and current will flow.

    To answer your question, the potential difference drives the current through a resistor (your body). Its Ohms Law. The current kills you, unless of course there is some other path that its able to flow to reach ground
     
  7. Jul 26, 2006 #6

    russ_watters

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  8. Jul 26, 2006 #7
    Reading that link answered the question I though I knew but perhaps, it was a misunderstanding.
    However following questions remain...
    1. since electricity is passed as the analogy of inserting a ball in a tube filled w/ balls so another ball will come out from the other side. However, if I am standing on wood, than that means that the other side is blocked, however, the real process is much more complicated. Meaning, if I insert an electron into an atom, another electron gets into another, and so on, how would the electrons know that there isn't a conductor on the other side.

    I think I already have the answer to this question but I need to confirm it w/ you guys, electrons only start inserting themselves when they are being attracted by another conductor on the other side(such as if I am standing on ground and touching an electric wire)- which leads to another question, what would happen if the process of transferation has been started but contact from both sides is eleminated b/f the process can be completed(I know transferation is really fast but still, I know it is not at the speed of light so theoretically, conductors can be eliminated, what would happen to the unstable atoms though?)

    2. My second question is, why does it damage my body since all it does is travel through my body.

    I think I also have the answer to this question but I need to check it w/ you guys too, when it happens on a higher voltage, this process occurs much faster which starts damaging our atoms, which leads to the damage of our cells.

    3. Just wondering, what would happen if you insert an electron into an atom and close all other ways out? If it would become stable after a while then what would happen if you open its way out then?

    4. Another just wondering question, is our body good conductor of electricity?
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2006
  9. Jul 26, 2006 #8

    russ_watters

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    It is partly because people resist the flow and absorb some of the energy (creating heat). What actually kills you, though, is the electricity inteferes with the electrical signal that makes your heart work.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2006
  10. Jul 26, 2006 #9
    so you mean the weakness we get by being electricuted is only temporary?(till the circulation can be normal again)

    Also remember to answer my above questions organizably, thx.
     
  11. Jul 27, 2006 #10

    Danger

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    I've just returned from a pool practice, and have had an incredible amount of beer, so I'm going to address only one of your follow-up questions right now. When your heart stops, it stops--right now, no going back. If caught in time, CPR or an epinephrin needle or a defibrillator can revive you. It's not likely to happen on its own. (Mentors, please excuse the shouting.) DO NOT SCREW AROUND WITH LINE CURRENT!!! Experiment all that you want to with AAA-D batteries. They won't hurt you, and you can learn all of the basics from playing with them. There is, however, a fire hazard with them if you don't use large enough wires. Go for at least #40 just to be sure.
     
  12. Jul 27, 2006 #11
    I am just talking about getting a minor shock, you know, when you get electricuted, the weakness I get, does that stay as long as I don't nutrition or just as long as my circulation gets okay?

    Here are rest of my questions...
    1. since electricity is passed as the analogy of inserting a ball in a tube filled w/ balls so another ball will come out from the other side. However, if I am standing on wood, than that means that the other side is blocked, however, the real process is much more complicated. Meaning, if I insert an electron into an atom, another electron gets into another, and so on, how would the electrons know that there isn't a conductor on the other side.

    I think I already have the answer to this question but I need to confirm it w/ you guys, electrons only start inserting themselves when they are being attracted by another conductor on the other side(such as if I am standing on ground and touching an electric wire)- which leads to another question, what would happen if the process of transferation has been started but contact from both sides is eleminated b/f the process can be completed(I know transferation is really fast but still, I know it is not at the speed of light so theoretically, conductors can be eliminated, what would happen to the unstable atoms though?)

    2. My second question is, why does it damage my body since all it does is travel through my body.

    I think I also have the answer to this question but I need to check it w/ you guys too, when it happens on a higher voltage, this process occurs much faster which starts damaging our atoms, which leads to the damage of our cells.

    3. Just wondering, what would happen if you insert an electron into an atom and close all other ways out? If it would become stable after a while then what would happen if you open its way out then?

    4. Another just wondering question, is our body good conductor of electricity?
     
  13. Jul 27, 2006 #12

    Danger

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    As I said, the remainder of your questions have to wait. I've had a ****-load of beer, I have to be up in 8 hours to go to work, and I have a horny wife waiting for me downstairs. This could easily result in me sleeping on the chesterfield if I devote myself to you instead of her. I'll catch up to you tomorrow.
     
  14. Jul 27, 2006 #13
    3. i'll answer this one first, because 1. depende on this explanation: now were talking about dielectric atoms (not then ones in metal, the ones that molecules are made of) - some atoms can handle another electron (Cl can get another electron, O can get two more, N can get three...) when this happen these atoms are called ions.

    1. the balls can't get ontop of eachother, so - yes, they got to have a way out for you to be able to insert the new ones.
    note that you dont take electrons from the atoms in metal, these are free electrons in the conductions band - they dont belong to any atom, the "atoms" is the metal are actually positive ions.
    you can imagine it by thinking of the possitive ions as rocks and the free electrons as water around them.

    2.
    4. in dry conditions, the human body is around 100,000 ohms, in wet condition, it can get to 1000 ohms.
    high voltage would also ionize the body and make it much less resistant - like a lightning bolt ionizes the air.
     
  15. Jul 27, 2006 #14
    A few more questions...
    1. if there are 2 very high voltage current, and a wood is connecting them, well if you keep increasing them, will there come a point when it will overrun bad conducterism?
    2. Is there a limit to high voltage? I heard there are anti to everything, well is there such a thing as anticurrent?
    3. since electricity is passed as the analogy of inserting a ball in a tube filled w/ balls so another ball will come out from the other side. However, if I am standing on wood, than that means that the other side is blocked, however, the real process is much more complicated. Meaning, if I insert an electron into an atom, another electron gets into another, and so on, how would the electrons know that there isn't a conductor on the other side.

    4. I think I already have the answer to this question but I need to confirm it w/ you guys, electrons only start inserting themselves when they are being attracted by another conductor on the other side(such as if I am standing on ground and touching an electric wire)- am I right?
     
  16. Jul 31, 2006 #15
    Could anyone help me out?
    1. if there are 2 very high voltage current, and a wood is connecting them, well if you keep increasing them, will there come a point when it will overrun bad conducterism?
    2. Is there a limit to high voltage?
    3. I heard there are anti to everything, well is there such a thing as anticurrent?
    4. since electricity is passed as the analogy of inserting a ball in a tube filled w/ balls so another ball will come out from the other side. However, if I am standing on wood, than that means that the other side is blocked, however, the real process is much more complicated. Meaning, if I insert an electron into an atom, another electron gets into another, and so on, how would the electrons know that there isn't a conductor on the other side.

    I think I already have the answer to this question but I need to confirm it w/ you guys, electrons only start inserting themselves when they are being attracted by another conductor on the other side(such as if I am standing on ground and touching an electric wire)- am I right?
     
  17. Aug 1, 2006 #16
    I remember having to have help trying to understand why electricity "knows" that you have rubber boots on. But in the end it is quiet simple.

    I think the easiest way to explain it is this.

    Imagine a pool full of beach balls, so no more can fit. Now push another ball in. What happens? One of the balls that fit in before pops out because it's forced out that way. Why did that particular ball come out? Because it was the easiest to move out. Rubber boots make it particularly hard to get out that way, so instead it goes through your heart and into the other arm, and kills your ass.


    Anyway, I'm no expert on the subject, but I'll use my general knowledge and logic to try answer these.
    1. Yes, but it will probably jump through the air to the otherside first.
    2. I would say no. It doesn't seem logical for there to be a limit. Lightning is millions of volts, why stop there.
    3. Currect is just flow of electrons. Flow of anti-electrons (Are they just positrons?) might have absolutely nothing to do with electricity, what do I know. But if they did then my guess is it would probably be called a "current" or because "anti-current" sounds gay =p
    4. I sorta answered this above, it doesn't know anything. It just natural that the ball pops out in that spot since it's the easiest thing to do, like the fact that electricity would probably rather jump through air then pass through wood. It just goes the easiest way.
     
  18. Aug 1, 2006 #17
    Actually, If I am wearing rubber boots, I don't get electricuted.
    Btw, Assume that there are 2 very high voltage current and they are connected through a wood, they can't travel through air b/c may be they are in diff. room or are in vacuum.(whatever you wanna think, just know they can't travel through air) If I keep increasing eletricity, would it soon overcome bad conducterism?
     
  19. Aug 1, 2006 #18
    I answered yes to that one :).

    And you do get electrocuted if you make a circuit with your arms even if you do have rubber boots on, it just doesn't go into the floor.
     
  20. Aug 1, 2006 #19
    But what my question was that how does electricity know that that weather my other arm is making a circuit or not?

    I think they only start changing electrons when they are being attracted, is this true?
     
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