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Wouldn't the solid expand in all directions?

  1. Dec 9, 2013 #1
    2pw28PS.png

    In this case, wouldn't the solid expand in all directions? Wouldn't x and y decrease?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 9, 2013 #2

    mfb

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    If every distance in the solid expands, why would you expect a contraction of the material along the inner edge?

    (No, x and y do not decrease)
     
  4. Dec 9, 2013 #3
    Why is it that the solid only increases outward, though? Why does it no expand inwards as well? This would mean x and y (as shown in the picture) are decreasing. I just can't seem to understand why the object would grow in one direction for each component (horizontal and vertical) when looking at this image.
     
  5. Dec 10, 2013 #4

    mfb

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    It is growing in all directions - every distance between points increases, as the whole material stretches.
    As long as there is no fixed outer border which stops expansion in that direction, a uniform expansion of everything is the best way to avoid internal stress.
    It is not a liquid...
     
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