wind tunnel Definition and Topics - 11 Discussions

Wind tunnels are large tubes with air blowing through them which are used to replicate the interaction between air and an object flying through the air or moving along the ground. Researchers use wind tunnels to learn more about how an aircraft will fly. NASA uses wind tunnels to test scale models of aircraft and spacecraft. Some wind tunnels are large enough to contain full-size versions of vehicles. The wind tunnel moves air around an object, making it seem as if the object is flying.
Most of the time, large powerful fans blow air through the tube. The object being tested is held securely inside the tunnel so that it remains stationary. The object can be an aerodynamic test object such as a cylinder or an airfoil, an individual component, a small model of the vehicle, or a full-sized vehicle. The air moving around the stationary object shows what would happen if the object was moving through the air. The motion of the air can be studied in different ways; smoke or dye can be placed in the air and can be seen as it moves around the object. Coloured threads can also be attached to the object to show how the air moves around it. Special instruments can often be used to measure the force of the air exerted against the object.
The earliest wind tunnels were invented towards the end of the 19th century, in the early days of aeronautic research,
when many attempted to develop successful heavier-than-air flying machines. The wind tunnel was envisioned as a means of reversing the usual paradigm: instead of the air standing still and an object moving at speed through it, the same effect would be obtained if the object stood still and the air moved at speed past it. In that way a stationary observer could study the flying object in action, and could measure the aerodynamic forces being imposed on it.
The development of wind tunnels accompanied the development of the airplane. Large wind tunnels were built during World War II. Wind tunnel testing was considered of strategic importance during the Cold War development of supersonic aircraft and missiles.
Later, wind tunnel study came into its own: the effects of wind on man-made structures or objects needed to be studied when buildings became tall enough to present large surfaces to the wind, and the resulting forces had to be resisted by the building's internal structure. Determining such forces was required before building codes could specify the required strength of such buildings and such tests continue to be used for large or unusual buildings.
Circa the 1960s, wind tunnel testing was applied to automobiles, not so much to determine aerodynamic forces per se but more to determine ways to reduce the power required to move the vehicle on roadways at a given speed. In these studies, the interaction between the road and the vehicle plays a significant role, and this interaction must be taken into consideration when interpreting the test results. In an actual situation the roadway is moving relative to the vehicle but the air is stationary relative to the roadway, but in the wind tunnel the air is moving relative to the roadway, while the roadway is stationary relative to the test vehicle. Some automotive-test wind tunnels have incorporated moving belts under the test vehicle in an effort to approximate the actual condition, and very similar devices are used in wind tunnel testing of aircraft take-off and landing configurations.
Wind tunnel testing of sporting equipment has also been prevalent over the years, including golf clubs, golf balls, Olympic bobsleds, Olympic cyclists, and race car helmets. Helmet aerodynamics is particularly important in open cockpit race cars (Indycar, Formula One). Excessive lift forces on the helmet can cause considerable neck strain on the driver, and flow separation on the back side of the helmet can cause turbulent buffeting and thus blurred vision for the driver at high speeds.The advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling on high-speed digital computers has reduced the demand for wind tunnel testing.

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  1. Aun Muhammad

    Single and Dual-Rotating Propeller Question

    Hoping that someone can explain what the optimum angular displacement between the front and rear propellers actually means here in the following paragraph. It concerns the single-rotation case of the experiment: "Both the eight-blade single- and dual-rotating propellers were mounted in four-way...
  2. K

    Lift and Drag force in a Wind Tunnel

    Hello guys, I am trying to calculate the lift force and drag force in a wind tunnel at my school as a part of a project that i am doing. I am varying the length of the airfoils and trying to measure the lift force and drag force. I have 3-d printed 7 airfoils. However, I am not able to find any...
  3. T

    Help building a Wind Tunnel

    Hi everyone, I am new and I hope I'm putting this in the right section. I am currently a Sophomore in High school and I am building a wind tunnel. It's not for a class but rather its is like an independent study. I have been into planes pretty much all my life and I am hoping to get a pilots...
  4. FQVBSina

    Pressure and flow speed relationship in wind tunnel

    I need 250 m/s of airflow speed in a wind tunnel. I can assume for this purpose, the test section of the wind tunnel has uniform flow. However, the wind tunnel can only generate a flow rate of 100 m/s but the pressure can be increased. I am drawing a blank on how could a generic boundary layer...
  5. F

    Wind tunnel measurements

    I'm nearly at the end of my preliminary testing for a wind tunnel in my A2 physics coursework. My question for my project so far is: "Do different shaped objects exhibit different properties under the influence of high speed air". For my coursework I need to measure or observe something to get a...
  6. O

    Why Does Bernoulli's Equation Apply to Wind Tunnels?

    I hope this question doesn't have too obvious of an answer. Basically, I still cannot grasp why Bernoulli's equation applies for wind tunnels and pitot-static probes. According to my textbook ("Introduction to Flight" by Anderson), Bernoulli's equation holds only when comparing two points...
  7. yangshi

    Choked flow out of air compressor and wind tunnels

    I posted this on Eng-tips and no replies yet:( I'm trying to design an as-simple-and-cheap-as-possible supersonic wind tunnel using an air compressor (this even possible? given the energy losses from shock waves...). I have access to a Porter-Cable 150psi, .8hp air compressor. Questions: 1...
  8. Mr.hev

    Calculating Reynolds number for a wind tunnel

    Hi All! as you can see I'm new here! i signed up in order to ask for a wee bit of help with my thesis! (now dont get me wrong Im not exactly asking anyone to write it for me!) Ive found myself at a small bit of a loose end here, as a mechanical engineering student i am perfectly capable of...
  9. H

    Oblique Shock Angle

    Is there an equation to calculate the oblique shock angle for supersonic flow when the given angle of attack is greater than 0, but less than the half angle? In my particular practical experiment, the half angle of the aerofoil is 5 degrees, so want to get a variety of figures between 5 and -5...
  10. C

    Wind pressure

    I am a skydiving coach and I am trying to figure out how many pounds of force wind moving approximately 120 mph has on something with a surface area of 25 square inches. I know turbulence and compression play into it as we'll but I just want a general formula to figure it out. The object is...
  11. P

    Drag and Lift Sensors for a Subsonic Wind Tunnel

    Hey everyone, I'm a student working on building a wind tunnel with some classmates. I'm in charge of figuring out the drag and lift force sensors. I'm currently looking these two components: http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_2128260_-1...
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