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A good geometry book

  1. Jul 16, 2011 #1
    I missed a lot of math in my high school and I hated geometry most. What geometry book would be a good start for me? I found a lot of them on amazon.com but I am tight in money and I don't want to pay for one book. Any honest advice?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 16, 2011 #2

    xts

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    I am not joking at all: the best ever geometry book are Euclid's Elements.
     
  4. Jul 16, 2011 #3
    You can download geometry course notes from Oxford MI http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/courses#part a".

    I think "good book" can mean a few different things, at least when it comes to math ... Sometimes books that are intended to be strictly pedagogical are more helpful for learning an entirely new subject. So course notes are usually pretty good for that, or first- or second-year college textbooks depending on the topic.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  5. Jul 21, 2011 #4
    If at all possible, try to preview it.
    For example, see if books.google.com has a PDF.
    Every textbook has to make assumptions about what the student already understands. As much as humanly possible, you want to make sure it assumes stuff you already know.

    Also, the similar threads seems to have several answers.
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=221706
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=139325
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=463361

    Also, since you mention high school level, focus on "Analytic Geometry" or Euclidean Geometry, and avoid Differential or Manifold.
    I'm not real familiar with non-Euclidean geometry, but it's not essential. (Got a B.S. in Math, pretty much only knowing "non-Euclidean geometries allow parallel lines which intersect.")
    You might need to pick one with proofs, depending on how far your math studies will ultimately extend.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2011
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