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Alpha particle

  1. Jun 25, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    What is the charge of an alpha particle?

    Charge of electron = 2.50x10^-21

    2. Relevant equations

    3. The attempt at a solution

    Would you have to multipy 2.50x10^-21 x 2 to get the charge?
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 25, 2010 #2


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    The charge of an electron is 1.6x10-19C. Use that instead.
  4. Jun 25, 2010 #3
    Where does that number come from and what are the units? I ask because I thought the charge of an electron is -1.602 x 10^-19 Coulombs.

    An alpha particle is two protons and two neutrons. Only the protons have charge so...
  5. Jun 25, 2010 #4
    Okay the charge of the proton is 1.60x10^-19 C. What I am asking is what is the charge of an alpha particle. Do you have to multiple the charge by 2 because there are two protons? Or is the charge just 1.60x10^-19 C.

  6. Jun 25, 2010 #5
    Yes, you would have to multiply by two.
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