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An abundant cheap dense liquid?

  1. Sep 15, 2016 #1
    I was looking at the density of liquids and wanted to find a really dense but abundant liquid. I know that Mercury is quite dense, but is fairly abundant?

    I was also thinking about ferrofluids :

    1. How dense is it?
    2. Can it be made in increasing densities and up to what density possibly?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 15, 2016 #2

    BvU

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    How about molten lead ? Or is the temperature a problem ? (you didn't mention that, though)
     
  4. Sep 15, 2016 #3

    berkeman

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    Can you say what the application is?
     
  5. Sep 15, 2016 #4
    Or molten Uranium for that matter, (depleted will do, it makes radioactivity less problematic).
    It actually a fairly abundant element and very dense, but getting access to it legally would doubtless be a problem though.
     
  6. Sep 16, 2016 #5

    Vanadium 50

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    How abundant is fairly abundant? I could order some today and have it tomorrow. (Well, I could if tomorrow weren't Saturday)
     
  7. Sep 16, 2016 #6
    no I need it in regular temperature of ...like room temperature
     
  8. Sep 16, 2016 #7
    I wanted to know if I could make a bottom end of a large container much more dense than just what was occurring through regular liquid depth. Like layering from more dense to less dense (the way oil and water is)
     
  9. Sep 16, 2016 #8
    like you can load a large container ship of it . And not something acidic and dangerous like bromine
     
  10. Sep 16, 2016 #9
    So nobody knows how dense a ferrofluid can get? Or is that some open ended type question?
     
  11. Sep 16, 2016 #10

    Vanadium 50

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    It's like asking "how dense can a red fluid be?".

    A container ship can't even sail with all its containers filled with water.
     
  12. Sep 17, 2016 #11

    Vanadium 50

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    Oh, and ferrofluids are substantially more expensive than mercury. Filling a Container to its maximum weight (not maximum volume) is over $4 million. It would take the world GDP for a year to fill a (very large) container ship.
     
  13. Sep 17, 2016 #12
    So how easy is it to make a ferrofluid that is say 10g/cm3 ? Is this even possible? I am not talking about trying to fill container ships with it. It was just some off the cuff remark because I didn't know how else to talk of relative abundance.
     
  14. Sep 17, 2016 #13

    Vanadium 50

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    Since iron has a density of 7.8, pretty doggone hard.
     
  15. Sep 17, 2016 #14
    Ok...good point -- how about 4? I kind thought since Mercury is 14 and liquid.... Completely forgot about Iron density
     
  16. Sep 17, 2016 #15

    Baluncore

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  17. Sep 19, 2016 #16
    So I read the Barium Sulfate is not soluble in water -- does that mean after a time, it would settle to the bottom? Thus you need to constantly keep mixing it?

    What about bentonite? I can't even find the density on this liquid compound?.
     
  18. Sep 19, 2016 #17
    So what is the maximum density that you know a ferrofluid can be made to?
     
  19. Sep 19, 2016 #18
  20. Sep 19, 2016 #19

    Vanadium 50

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    This is getting tiresome:

    Will this work?
    No.
    What about this?
    No.
    What about this?
    Lather, rinse and repeat.

    If you don't tell us what you are trying to do, the odds of us hitting on an acceptable solution are very, very small.
     
  21. Sep 19, 2016 #20
    Why are you getting so impatient ? I have asked my questions in a pretty straightforward method. I am not an engineer or some physics student who can formulate any question of the top of my head without having some ambiguities. Asking about how dense a ferrofluid can be made is not that obvious a question??!!! I read on a yahoo answer that it can get to 3.4g per cm cube. Then it says you can achieve 20g per cube in the presence of a magnetic field which then confused me so I wanted to clarify because that was higher than Steel. Maybe there was something that could have been mixed into achieve something much higher than the 3.4g/cm3 . You never directly answered the question - you never gave me a range of what is reasonable for ferrofluid -- so I asked again. The yahoo answer I thought would not be as clear as an answer given by true engineers here who could give input.

    Somebody asked me what the application is and I answered them --

    " I wanted to know if I could make a bottom end of a large container much more dense than just what was occurring through regular liquid depth. Like layering from more dense to less dense (the way oil and water is"

    why would I want a layering of dense liquids?? I was thinking of an application that when displaced into the layers, the bottom layer would have a much greater upward force so as to push the bottom of an object that had a smaller surface area then at the top; thus a greater displacement volume in the entire liquid.
     
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