Analyzing Forces in a Diving Board System

In summary: Imagine taking pillar A away. Which way would the part of the board above A move?In summary, the conversation discusses the directions of the forces exerted at points A and B in a scenario where a diver is standing on a diving board held up by two pillars. It is determined that B is pointing upwards as the fulcrum, while A is pointing downwards to counter the diver's weight. The example of a see-saw is used to illustrate this concept.
  • #1
STEM_STRUGGLES
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Homework Statement


There is a diving board held up by two pillars A and B, and there is a diver standing on it's edge. What are the directions of the forces exerted at points A and B? Picture Below:
okpdG11.png

Homework Equations


F_NET = 0
T_NET =0

The Attempt at a Solution


I thought both A and B were pointed upwards since the diver is pushing downwards, but apparently B is upwards and A is downwards.
 
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  • #2
STEM_STRUGGLES said:

Homework Statement


There is a diving board held up by two pillars A and B, and there is a diver standing on it's edge. What are the directions of the forces exerted at points A and B? Picture Below:
okpdG11.png

Homework Equations


F_NET = 0
T_NET =0

The Attempt at a Solution


I thought both A and B were pointed upwards since the diver is pushing downwards, but apparently B is upwards and A is downwards.
Welcome to the PF.

Think of a see-saw with the point B being the fulcrum. What do you see now?
 
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  • #3
berkeman said:
Welcome to the PF.

Think of a see-saw with the point B being the fulcrum. What do you see now?
Oh, wow! I see point B as pointing up now, but what about point A? If I use A as the fulcrum, doesn't that still make it point upwards in order to keep the board from rotating downwards?
 
  • #4
STEM_STRUGGLES said:
Oh, wow! I see point B as pointing up now, but what about point A? If I use A as the fulcrum, doesn't that still make it point upwards in order to keep the board from rotating downwards?
B is the fulcrum. Did you never use a see-saw? :smile:
 
  • #5
berkeman said:
B is the fulcrum. Did you never use a see-saw? :smile:
Ok, I'm still confused. Sorry. If B is the fulcrum and it's force is going upwards, I'm still not understanding how A's force is going downwards. Given the see-saw example, the diver is on one end pulling down on the end of the see-saw, and A is somehow pulling downwards even though it's on the bottom? I really appreciate the help!
 
  • #6
STEM_STRUGGLES said:
Ok, I'm still confused. Sorry. If B is the fulcrum and it's force is going upwards, I'm still not understanding how A's force is going downwards. Given the see-saw example, the diver is on one end pulling down on the end of the see-saw, and A is somehow pulling downwards even though it's on the bottom? I really appreciate the help!
What if the person sitting on the right side of the see-saw is heavier than the person sitting on the left side? What happens to the left side of the see-saw? :smile:
 
  • #7
berkeman said:
What if the person sitting on the right side of the see-saw is heavier than the person sitting on the left side? What happens to the left side of the see-saw? :smile:
It goes upwards, but I don't know what happens at point A because A is on the underside of the diving board.
 
  • #8
STEM_STRUGGLES said:
It goes upwards, but I don't know what happens at point A because A is on the underside of the diving board.
Imagine taking pillar A away. Which way would the part of the board above A move?
 

Related to Analyzing Forces in a Diving Board System

What is static equilibrium of a board?

Static equilibrium of a board refers to the state where all forces acting on the board are balanced, resulting in no movement or rotation of the board. This means that the board is at rest and remains in the same position unless acted upon by an external force.

What are the conditions for static equilibrium of a board?

The conditions for static equilibrium of a board are that the sum of all forces acting on the board must be equal to zero and the sum of all torques (rotational forces) acting on the board must also be equal to zero. This means that the board must be in a state of both translational and rotational equilibrium.

How can the center of mass affect static equilibrium of a board?

The center of mass is the point at which the entire mass of an object can be considered to be concentrated. If the center of mass of a board is not directly above the point of support, the board will experience a torque and will not be in static equilibrium. This will cause the board to tip or rotate.

What are the applications of understanding static equilibrium of a board?

Understanding static equilibrium of a board is important in various fields such as engineering, architecture, and physics. It helps in designing stable structures and predicting their behavior under different forces. It also plays a role in determining the stability of objects, such as a ladder or a shelf, to prevent accidents.

How can one achieve static equilibrium of a board?

To achieve static equilibrium of a board, the forces acting on the board must be balanced. This can be achieved by adjusting the position or magnitude of the forces or by adding additional forces to counteract any imbalances. The center of mass must also be directly above the point of support to prevent any rotational forces.

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