Another specific heat question

In summary, to calculate the specific heat capacity of nickel, we first need to calculate the heat energy for water at 13.5 degrees C using the formula Q=mcT. Then, we can use the specific heat capacity of water at that temperature, which is 4.1813 JK^-1g^-1. Assuming that the nickel remains in its solid state, we can use the constant specific heat capacity of 4.18 JK^-1g^-1 to calculate the heat energy for the nickel. Finally, we can use the formula Q=mcdeltaT to calculate the specific heat capacity of nickel.
  • #1
dav1d
65
0

Homework Statement



A 28.2 g sample of nickel is heated to 100 degrees C and placed in a coffee cup calorimeter containing 150g of water at a temperature of 13.5 degrees C. After the metal cools, the final temperature of the metal and water is 25 degrees C. Calculate the specific heat capacity of nickel.


Homework Equations



Q=mcdeltaT

The Attempt at a Solution



first calculate Q for water.
Q=mcT
=(150g)

But what is c for water at 13.5degrees? Problem, now I don't know what to do from here.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
c = the specific heat capacity which is a constant or a material ie. the specific heat capacity for water is 4.18 JK^-1g^-1 ;)
 
  • #3
Um, water has different c values at different temperatures.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_capacity#Table_of_specific_heat_capacities

Water at 100 °C (steam) gas 2.080 37.47 28.03
Water at 25 °C liquid 4.1813 75.327 74.53 4.1796
Water at 100 °C liquid 4.1813 75.327 74.53 4.2160
Water at −10 °C (ice)[20] solid 2.11 38.09 1.938
 
  • #4
dav1d said:
Um, water has different c values at different temperatures.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_capacity#Table_of_specific_heat_capacities

Water at 100 °C (steam) gas 2.080 37.47 28.03
Water at 25 °C liquid 4.1813 75.327 74.53 4.1796
Water at 100 °C liquid 4.1813 75.327 74.53 4.2160
Water at −10 °C (ice)[20] solid 2.11 38.09 1.938
not according to my textbook. I think that specific heat capacitys must change when they states are change. If that is that case, at 13 degrees, water should still be 4.1813. (I'm only making assumptions here)
 
  • #5
As explained in other thread - specific heat is a function of temperature, but differences are usually small enough that we can assume it is constant - as long as the substance doesn't change its state. This is especially true for water and most metals between 0-100°C. Use 4.18 J/Kg and don't worry.
 
  • #6
Sorry. Will fix later.
 

1. What is specific heat and how is it measured?

Specific heat is the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of one gram of a substance by one degree Celsius. It is usually measured in units of J/g°C, or joules per gram degree Celsius. It can be measured experimentally by using a calorimeter and recording the change in temperature of a substance when a known amount of heat is added.

2. How does specific heat differ between substances?

Specific heat can vary between different substances due to their molecular structure and composition. For example, substances with a higher specific heat have stronger intermolecular forces, which require more energy to break and increase the temperature. This is why substances like water have a higher specific heat than metals.

3. Can specific heat change under different conditions?

Yes, specific heat can change under different conditions. It can vary with temperature, pressure, and phase of a substance. For example, the specific heat of water changes with temperature, with a higher specific heat at lower temperatures and a lower specific heat at higher temperatures.

4. How is specific heat used in practical applications?

Specific heat is used in various practical applications, such as in cooking, heating and cooling systems, and industrial processes. It helps determine the amount of energy required to heat or cool a substance, as well as the efficiency of a heating or cooling system. It is also used in thermodynamics to calculate the change in internal energy of a system.

5. What is the relationship between specific heat and heat capacity?

Specific heat and heat capacity are related but not the same. Specific heat refers to the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of a substance by one degree Celsius per gram, while heat capacity refers to the amount of heat energy required to raise the temperature of an entire object by one degree Celsius. Specific heat is an intensive property, while heat capacity is an extensive property that depends on the amount of substance present.

Similar threads

  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
4K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
4K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
6K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
960
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Biology and Chemistry Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
3K
Back
Top