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Associated photon

  1. Jun 21, 2007 #1
    Please let me know how would you characterize a photon associated to an electromagnetic wave propagating with u<c through a dielectric.
    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 21, 2007 #2

    pervect

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    I'd characterize it as a photon that was constantly being absorbed and re-emitted.

    The interesting part is how with a perfectly regular crystal structure you can have transparent materials that refract light. This involves some tricky aspects of superpositions of states that are not classical when treated in a quantum manner, i.e. with photons.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2007
  4. Jun 21, 2007 #3
    It is a stretch to assume it is the same photon.
    An absorbed photon is gone forever.
     
  5. Jun 21, 2007 #4

    rbj

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    i thought i remember reading on these very pages that this absorbtion and re-emmision is not what is happening in a transparent material. this was in the context of why light is slower in something that is not vacuum.

    EDIT: actually, it wasn't these pages, but wikipedia:

    i dunno who's right, and am not worried about it. but i'm curious.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2007
  6. Jun 21, 2007 #5

    pervect

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    Zapperz is the best person to ask, though I think he's written it down in the FAQ and is a bit tired of repeating himself. I suppose I ought to go re-read the FAQ myself.
     
  7. Jun 22, 2007 #6
    does hf work in the medium?

    I extend my question. Does hf work in the medium?
     
  8. Jun 22, 2007 #7

    pervect

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  9. Jun 22, 2007 #8
    hf in the e.m. wave propagating through a medium

     
  10. Jun 22, 2007 #9

    pervect

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    I'm not quite sure what you are asking. In SR in a vacuum, the doppler shift factor will depend only on the velocity of the two observers relative to each other - in this case, the doppler shift factor will depend on the speed of each observer relative to the medium.
     
  11. Jun 22, 2007 #10
    e.m. wave through a medium

    Thanks. You understood exactly my question. I think that only in your reply should be extended as: The Doppler shift factor depends in that case on the relative velocity of the two involved observers, on the velocity at which the wave propagates relative to the two observers and on c, due to the fact that in both reference frames clock synchronization is performed. From that point of view the Doppler shift formula should have, in the case of the longitudinal case, the same algebraic structure as the Doppler shift formula in the case of an acoustic wave has. My problem is that if in the case of the e.m. wave propagating through the medium, the frequencies f and f' detected by the two observers are related by
    hf=hf'D
    D being the corresponding Doppler factor?
    Regards and thanks
    Bernhard
     
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