Best textbook for properties of matter and fluid mechanics

  • Intro Physics
  • Thread starter CurioPhysicist
  • Start date
  • #1
I am a First Year Undergraduate Physics student. Which will be the best textbook for me to study properties of matter (Elasticity) and fluid mechanics? I prefer a better theoretical understanding.
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
BvU
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
13,847
3,416
Hello @CurioPhysicist , :welcome: !

Properties of matter is a bit too broad a subject for me... it excludes very little :smile: ##-## so much to choose from.

I'm a physicist but took a chemical engineering course later on. There I bumped into Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot : transport phenomena.
 
  • #3
Hello @CurioPhysicist , :welcome: !

Properties of matter is a bit too broad a subject for me... it excludes very little :smile: ##-## so much to choose from.

I'm a physicist but took a chemical engineering course later on. There I bumped into Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot : transport phenomena.
Actually, I mean elasticity..
 
  • #4
BvU
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
13,847
3,416
I see. Good you edited your post: now it's a narrow subject indeed :wink: .
Downside is that in the ordinary physics curriculum there isn't much time spent on elasticity. I don't recall any at all. Perhaps mechanical engineering courses have more (metallurgy, for instance).
Don't know of a decent textbook.
 
  • #5
I see. Good you edited your post: now it's a narrow subject indeed :wink: .
Downside is that in the ordinary physics curriculum there isn't much time spent on elasticity. I don't recall any at all. Perhaps mechanical engineering courses have more (metallurgy, for instance).
Don't know of a decent textbook.
Oh 🥺
 
  • #6
berkeman
Mentor
58,754
8,875
Which will be the best textbook for me to study properties of matter (Elasticity) and fluid mechanics?
Yeah, elasticity would typically be covered in ME courses and textbooks. Other properties of matter would be in Materials Science textbooks. Have a look in your class listings to see what textbooks are required for the introductory courses for those subjects, and then look through them at your university library (assuming it's open right now).

Fluid mechanics is a different animal, but again I would look to see what introductory courses are offered at your uni and look at those textbooks. Paging @boneh3ad :smile:
 
  • #7
Yeah, elasticity would typically be covered in ME courses and textbooks. Other properties of matter would be in Materials Science textbooks. Have a look in your class listings to see what textbooks are required for the introductory courses for those subjects, and then look through them at your university library (assuming it's open right now).

Fluid mechanics is a different animal, but again I would look to see what introductory courses are offered at your uni and look at those textbooks. Paging @boneh3ad :smile:
My Uni handbook only suggest Physics by HRK for Properties of Matter
 
  • #8
berkeman
Mentor
58,754
8,875
My Uni handbook only suggest Physics by HRK for Properties of Matter
For which subject? What does the section on Mechanical Engineering have as a textbook for the first course on Material Science?
 
  • #9
For which subject? What does the section on Mechanical Engineering have as a textbook for the first course on Material Science?
I am studying in Physics. The name of the course is Properties of Matter, Vibration and Waves
 
  • #10
berkeman
Mentor
58,754
8,875
What does the section on Mechanical Engineering have as a textbook for the first course on Material Science?
 
  • #11
Sorry, I don't have a course called Material Science.
 
  • #12
berkeman
Mentor
58,754
8,875
But your university does, under the ME department probably. You asked for textbooks in that subject.
 
  • #13
But your university does, under the ME department probably. You asked for textbooks in that subject.
Oh, I see. But, I don't have reach to the handbook of that Department.
 
  • #14
berkeman
Mentor
58,754
8,875
Really? Such information is usually online as well as in other places.
 
  • #15
Really? Such information is usually online as well as in other places.
My University website doesn't.
 
  • #17
caz
Gold Member
98
66
I love Elasticity, Fracture and Flow by Jaeger. Check out Tritton for fluids.
 
  • Like
Likes CurioPhysicist
  • #18
boneh3ad
Science Advisor
Insights Author
Gold Member
3,192
871
I don't honestly know what to suggest form an undergraduate physics standpoint. Landau and Lifshitz certainly have volumes on both of these topics that come from a physics perspective (Volumes 6 and 7 specifically), but they are going to be pretty dense for an undergraduate.

Most of the time fluid mechanics and elasticity are covered by engineering departments in modern education systems, but the issue there is that they generally lead off with fairly applied treatments of the topic and then circle back around to the more heavy theoretical approaches in graduate school. Basically, any mechanical engineering textbook on fluid mechanics is going to spend a lot of time on things like hydrostatics and pipe flows and not so much on potential theory and streamfunctions. Landau and Lifshitz may still be your best bet if you want straight theory from a physics angle.
 
  • Informative
  • Like
Likes berkeman and CurioPhysicist
  • #19
jasonRF
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,366
434
I am studying in Physics. The name of the course is Properties of Matter, Vibration and Waves
Just to be clear, is this a course that you will be taking soon? If so, what are the math and physics prerequisites for the class? Without that information it is impossible for us to recommend a relevant resource. If not, then we would need to know what physics and math you have already learned.

jason
 
  • #20
Just to be clear, is this a course that you will be taking soon? If so, what are the math and physics prerequisites for the class? Without that information it is impossible for us to recommend a relevant resource. If not, then we would need to know what physics and math you have already learned.

jason
This course is in the first year second semester. In first semester, we were taught Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, Differential Equations (ordinary) and Matrices, Calculus.
 
  • #21
BvU
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
13,847
3,416
From another thread: I bumped into an introductory Properties of matter covering both elastcity and fluid mechanics plus some other stuff, all in just 62 pages :smile: !

With a caveat from @Hamiltonian299792458
and one from me as well (even as a non-native english reader): it's riddled with language and spelling errors :rolleyes:
 
  • #22
vanhees71
Science Advisor
Insights Author
Gold Member
16,653
7,931
Landau and Lifshitz vol. 6+7, but it's graduate level.
 
  • #23
124
47
For fluid mechanics the book of Kundu and Cohen is excellent:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/012405935X/?tag=pfamazon01-20

Wave motion of Billingham and King is good (pretty high level though, 'advanced undergraduate' for mathematical students according to the authors):
https://www.amazon.com/dp/0521634504/?tag=pfamazon01-20

I would bump Transport Phenomena from Bird, Stewart and Lightfoot as well, since it is really excellent, but it is probably not what you are looking for here, it is more about energy transport and mass transport (diffusion, mixing), hence the name.

For elasticity I don't know really, we had a handout at the uni... :)
 
Last edited:

Related Threads on Best textbook for properties of matter and fluid mechanics

  • Last Post
2
Replies
45
Views
78K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
3K
Replies
8
Views
809
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
66K
Replies
7
Views
18K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
7K
Top