Bicycles and Mechanical Advantage

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  • #76
russ_watters
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The issue with that is, because the force of static friction and the force imparted by the bike on the ground are an action-reaction pair. Then if they are not equal, how does Newton's 3rd Law apply?
How many times do we need to tell you that they are equal before you will internalize it and stop asking? [/exasperated]
 
  • #77
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... what about when the force of the bike exceeds the maximum possible static friction?
The wheel slips, it loses traction.
 
  • #78
Orodruin
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The issue with that is, because the force of static friction and the force imparted by the bike on the ground are an action-reaction pair. Then if they are not equal, how does Newton's 3rd Law apply?
You keep saying this and you keep getting the answer that they are equal. You will not get any further by insisting on something that you have been repeatedly told is not true. Again, this all seems to stem from fundamental misuderstandings of basic mechanical concepts, which is why I have recommended going back to study the basics of free body diagrams, forces, and torques.

Since we will not get anywhere until that has happened and the OP has been answered several times over, this thread is closed.
 

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