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Books on basic electronics

  1. Nov 7, 2017 #21

    ISamson

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    Ok, thank you very much, everyone for such insightful advice. I loved the books and will research further.
    See you.
     
  2. Nov 8, 2017 #22

    kith

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    Horowitz & Hill is probably over your head.

    I recommend a book with a hands-on approch: build things, burn things and learn the concepts on the way. As I posted in the other thread, I think "Make: electronics" by Charles Platt is a good book to start (especially for someone who links to makezine in his signature). It teaches the physical basics in a practical manner. If you understand things at this level, you can move on to more advanced texts.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2017
  3. Nov 8, 2017 #23
    The electronic sections on those books will necessarily be poor because you have to get the fundamentals down first before you can really get into the electronics. Also, as some of the other posters suggested, I would recommend getting some basic circuit components so that you can take a hands on approach while you learn. It is not only fun but helpful to understanding and building intuition, and it's cheap!

    FFR, if you click the up arrow at the top of the quote where it says "Poster said: [itex]\uparrow[/itex]" it will take you right to that post, eliminating the need to search the thread for where it was originally posted.
     
  4. Nov 8, 2017 #24

    Drakkith

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    Indeed. But that doesn't eliminate the need to often search through several posts to find the quote and the context. The quotes also take up much more space than typing up the question and are broken up into multiple pieces instead of being in a single sentence/paragraph. Occasionally quoting yourself if the situation calls for it, such as emphasizing something you wrote previously or when it would be a good idea to bring attention back to it, is perfectly fine. But throwing multiple short quotes together just to save yourself a small amount of time and effort typing something up is not.
     
  5. Nov 8, 2017 #25

    ISamson

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    I have an Arduino Starter Kit which includes an Arduino UNO and many components. This is not a problem.
     
  6. Nov 8, 2017 #26
    That's is a greater problem, :confused:because I believe you don't even know Adruino programming, which is simply a vast field. You can start with basic circuit components like diodes, transistors, amplifiers and the like, on a breadboard.
     
  7. Nov 8, 2017 #27

    ISamson

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    I do know Arduino programming, most of the basics.
     
  8. Nov 9, 2017 #28

    kith

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    I don't agree. It is both easier and more fun to start with the Arduino directly and explore the electrical components as you need them.

    Using personal computers, it is easy to control things but the things are abstract variables in the memory of the computer and the interfacing to the real world is hard. Using standard electronics, you work in the real world but controlling things is hard. The cool thing about microcontrollers like the Arduino is that they combine the easy parts of both spheres in order to enable you to control things in the real world right from the start.
     
  9. Nov 11, 2017 #29
    Yes, Horowitz and Hill is quite simply the definitive book. It’s not cheap, but it will cover everything needed for an undergraduate and masters course, and will serve you usefully for many years as a professional. I bought my copy in 1994, and have had more than 20 years useful service from it:
     
  10. Nov 11, 2017 #30

    ISamson

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    I agree. Arduinos are a very good start.
     
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