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Books on research

  1. Nov 16, 2007 #1
    I apologize if this is in the wrong forum, but this is the forum that seemed to fit my topic best.

    I'm a physics major, and i'd like to do research of some sort during my undergraduate years, and quite possibly afterwards as well. As far as labs go, I feel like I do average, even thought I have a 98% in my lab, I feel like there's so much that I'm missing, and if I were to get involved in research at this point, I believe I'd be ill-prepared. To me, research appears to be challenging, and that's one of the reasons that I find it appealing. Since I do much better following a text book than I do lab instructions, I'm curious if there are any books that anyone here can recommend that have to do with physics research: as in methods, types of research, procedure, error analysis, etc.

    Any recommendations are appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 16, 2007 #2

    Dr Transport

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    Go talk to your professors or post-docs in your department, get an idea about what they do and ask if you could learn about it if you are interested. It isn't hard to get someone to help you start. If your department has independent study/research as a separate course you're in even better shape.
     
  4. Nov 17, 2007 #3
    Thank you for the reply. You're right, I'll see if there's a course that's research related, that would definitely give me the preparation I'm looking for. But aside from my coursework, I'm still looking for some books that would prepare me for research. If there's not a course that I can take, preparation remains my number one concern.
     
  5. Nov 24, 2007 #4

    Chris Hillman

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    I see why posted in the book review forum, but tend to agree with the others that the whole point of being a registered university student is to seek out and obtain mentoring. Individual circumstances vary so greatly that I don't think you should go to a book for the kind of advice you seek!

    If you just want a cookbook for data analysis, that is another matter.
     
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