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B Brewster's law for incident vertically polarised light

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  1. May 14, 2017 #1
    Brewster's law on polarisation states that if a unpolarised light is incident at a certain angle of incidence, then part of it gets plane polarised and is reflected.

    What happens if the incident light itself is vertically polarised for the same brewster's angle and same wavelength of light used before?
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. May 14, 2017 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    What would be your intuitive answer to that? (And why)
     
  4. May 14, 2017 #3
    I would like to experiment before putting down any answer on such topics. Unfortunately, I do not have all the requirements currently for the experiment so I'll put no theoretical answer.
     
  5. May 14, 2017 #4
    I'd say that light rarely "gets polarized". In most cases, some polarizations are either absorbed or reflected away while others pass through.
    That should give you enough information to answer your question.
     
  6. May 14, 2017 #5
    You are referring to my case of incident polarised light or the normal one?
     
  7. May 14, 2017 #6

    sophiecentaur

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    I agree. It sounds as if something 'forced' the random E vectors all to lay in a certain direction. "Polarisation" of an unpolarised beam involves selection of the E component of all the random vectors in a chosen direction.
     
  8. May 14, 2017 #7

    sophiecentaur

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    What "normal" one?
     
  9. May 14, 2017 #8
    Incident unpolarised light.
     
  10. May 14, 2017 #9

    sophiecentaur

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    You seem to think there is something different about the Vertical components in a randomly polarised beam and the vertical components in a beam that has already passed through a polariser. You may need to re-think your ideas about what polarisation actually means.
    How much have you read about polarisation? You should do some reading round this topic - it's hardly worth my finding a link and copying it to you when you can find all this very easily. Try the Hyperphysics website. You can usually rely on getting good information from them. (There are some nonsense websites that talk about polarisation.)
     
  11. Jul 6, 2017 #10
    I am not quite sure about it.
     
  12. Jul 6, 2017 #11

    sophiecentaur

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    Which bit are you not sure about?
     
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