Calcium forms

  • Thread starter Longwell3
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Summary:

particle size

Main Question or Discussion Point

Regarding calcium in the bloodstream, in drinking water, and in food.

Are calcium ions always single, free atoms? Is that the definition of "dissolved?" (single atoms?)

Does the bloodstream contain any undissovled calcium? how much? how big?

Does drinking water contain any undissolved calcium? Does it all dissolve when consumed by animals?

Regarding calcium supplements, and antacids made from ground oyster shells : Do these large, undissolved pieces readliy "dissolve" in water or in the body? Or do some large chunks remain, roaming at large in the body?
 

Answers and Replies

BvU
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Hello Longwell, ##\qquad## :welcome: ##\qquad## !

Atomic Ca is a light, reactive metal-like element. As you already googled, I hope ?

Calcium ions are ions, not atoms. Dissolved means they are surrounded by H2O molecules

Does the bloodstream contain any undissolved calcium?
Does drinking water contain any undissolved calcium?
No.

Any solids containing Ca are precipitations of e.g. Ca(OH)2, CaSO4, CaCO3
 
TeethWhitener
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Summary: particle size

Regarding calcium supplements, and antacids made from ground oyster shells : Do these large, undissolved pieces readliy "dissolve" in water or in the body? Or do some large chunks remain, roaming at large in the body?
Those are almost always calcium carbonate, which dissolves readily at low pH (such as your stomach's environment).
 
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I am trying to visualize the calcium in the bloodstream. It is ALL in the same form, completely dissolved? If you swallow a particle of ground oyster shell it instantly dissolves into these identical ions which are all equally available to the cells?
 
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Those are almost always calcium carbonate, which dissolves readily at low pH (such as your stomach's environment).
Thanks. does "dissolved" mean all single, free ions? (one nucleus and and odd number of electrons), no larger aggregates will survive the stomach acid?
 
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I , for example, have been disagnosed with "calcific aoritc valve." Trying to understand the actual form of calcium that is aggregating there. How and why.
 
BvU
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I sympathize. No expertise in organic chemistry, but my feeling is that you are looking at plaque formation in an unpleasant place. The molecules involved are likely to be big organic complexes with some calcium in them.
Ask your doctor and ask for a referral if the answer is vague.
 
TeethWhitener
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I am trying to visualize the calcium in the bloodstream. It is ALL in the same form, completely dissolved?
Completely dissolved ≠ all in the same form. The calcium ion can be complexed (bound) by different species in the bloodstream, but under normal conditions none of it will be a solid like you're thinking of.
If you swallow a particle of ground oyster shell it instantly dissolves into these identical ions which are all equally available to the cells?
Thanks. does "dissolved" mean all single, free ions? (one nucleus and and odd number of electrons), no larger aggregates will survive the stomach acid?
Nothing happens instantly. The larger the particle of calcium carbonate, the longer it will take to dissolve. I suppose that if it's big enough, it won't dissolve completely in your stomach, in which case it will move into your intestines and get excreted. It certainly won't enter the bloodstream as a solid.
I , for example, have been disagnosed with "calcific aoritc valve." Trying to understand the actual form of calcium that is aggregating there. How and why.
Standard disclaimer: we can't dispense medical advice on PF.
That said, this article (might be paywalled) has some information:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4888946/
Abstract:
Calcification occurs in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and in the aortic valve. Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a slow, progressive disorder that ranges from mild valve thickening without obstruction of blood flow, termed aortic sclerosis, to severe calcification with impaired leaflet motion, termed aortic stenosis. In the past, this process was thought to be ‘degenerative’ because of time-dependent wear and tear of the leaflets, with passive calcium deposition. The presence of osteoblasts in atherosclerotic vascular lesions and in CAVD implies that calcification is an active, regulated process akin to atherosclerosis, with lipoprotein deposition and chronic inflammation. If calcification is active, via pro-osteogenic pathways, one might expect that development and progression of calcification could be inhibited. The overlap in the clinical factors associated with calcific valve disease and atherosclerosis provides further support for a shared disease mechanism. In our recent research we used an in vitro porcine valve interstitial cell model to study spontaneous calcification and potential promoters and inhibitors. Using this model, we found that denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand may, at a working concentration of 50 μg/mL, inhibit induced calcium deposition to basal levels.

I'm not an MD, but it looks like there's some debate as to exactly how the calcium deposits occur. Osteoblasts are bone cells, and they serve to deposit hydroxyapatite (a calcium mineral that makes up a large percentage of our bones), so if they are present, it implies an ongoing (or active) buildup of calcium deposits.
 

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