Calculate Heat Transfer Rate for Copper Coil

In summary, the speaker is seeking guidance to characterize the performance of their experiment involving a homemade copper coil submerged in a 3 gallon water tank for heating. They are looking for a way to measure the rate of heat transfer between the coil and the water, and are advised to measure the temperature of the water entering and leaving the coil, as well as the amount of water flowing through. The amount of energy lost from the hot water can then be calculated using specific conversions. The speaker is also reminded that the rate of heat transfer depends on the temperature difference between the coil and the water. They are recommended to consult resources on heat transfer for a detailed explanation on how to perform this calculation.
  • #1
evcarbo
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I’m working on an experiment and would appreciate some guidance to characterize the performance of it. I have a small homemade copper coil submerged in a 3 gallon water tank. I’m delivering hot water to the coil that in turn heats the water in the tank. I sense I’m looking for a rate of heat transfer between the coil and the water it is submerged in. How may I go about this?

Copper coil is 0.25-inch diameter, 18-feet long, 0.03inch thick
Water tank 3 gallons
 
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  • #2
Empirically, you need to measure three things:

1) Temperature of water entering the coil
2) Temperature of water leaving the coil
3) Amount of water flowing thru the coil

Now calculate the amount of energy lost from the hot water:
1 Calorie (or 4.19 Joules) raises 1 Gram of water 1oC
1 BTU (or 1055 Joules, or 252 Calories, or 3.41 WattHours) raises 1 Pound of water 1oF

Of course the rate of heat transfer depends on the temp. difference between the heating coil and the water in the 3 gallon container. The greater the temp. difference, the greater the rate of heat transfer.
 
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  • #3
OP: You really need to read a book on heat transfer or take a course. It would require too much space to explain in detail how to do this calculation here. I recommend Transport Phenomena by Bird, Stewart, and Lightfoot or the Chemical Engineers' Handbook by Perry et al or the Mechanical Engineers' Handbook by Marks.
 

Related to Calculate Heat Transfer Rate for Copper Coil

1. How do you calculate the heat transfer rate for a copper coil?

The heat transfer rate for a copper coil can be calculated using the formula: Q = UAΔT, where Q is the heat transfer rate, U is the overall heat transfer coefficient, A is the surface area of the coil, and ΔT is the temperature difference between the coil and its surroundings.

2. What is the overall heat transfer coefficient for a copper coil?

The overall heat transfer coefficient for a copper coil depends on various factors such as the material of the coil, its geometry, and the fluid medium surrounding it. It can be calculated using the formula: U = (1/ha + t/k + 1/hi), where ha is the convective heat transfer coefficient of the surrounding fluid, t is the thickness of the coil, k is the thermal conductivity of the coil material, and hi is the convective heat transfer coefficient of the fluid inside the coil.

3. How do you determine the surface area of a copper coil?

The surface area of a copper coil can be determined by calculating the circumference of the coil using its diameter and multiplying it by its length. This will give the total external surface area of the coil. However, if the coil has a complex shape, it may be more accurate to use a 3D scanning or modeling technique to determine its surface area.

4. What affects the temperature difference between a copper coil and its surroundings?

The temperature difference between a copper coil and its surroundings is affected by various factors such as the heat source or sink, the convective heat transfer coefficient of the surrounding fluid, and the thermal conductivity of the coil material.

5. Can other materials be used instead of copper for a coil?

Yes, other materials such as aluminum or steel can also be used for a coil. However, the heat transfer rate and overall heat transfer coefficient may vary depending on the material properties of the coil. It is important to consider the specific requirements of the application when choosing a material for a coil.

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