Calculating Liters of Water Raised From Well

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In summary, the problem involves a horse working for 8 hours to raise water from a well that is 20 feet deep. The density of water is 1.0 X 10^3 kg/m^3. The question is how many liters of water the horse raised from the well and how much energy was produced and required for this task. To solve this problem, the depth of the well needs to be converted from feet to meters and standard units for mass, length, and energy should be used. The equation used to calculate the work done is W= F dx, where F= ma. The power of the horse is assumed to be 1 horsepower and all its energy goes into raising the water. The equation used to calculate
  • #1
jezelee
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here is the question...water w/ density 1.0 X 10 (3) kg/m cubed, a well 20 feet deep, and a horse worked for 8 hours. How many liters of water did the horse raise from the well? I am ok in unit conversions, but I need help in figuring out steps in solving this problem.
 
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  • #2
What do you think? How much energy does the horse produce in those 8 hours? (Assume its power is 1 horse power. :wink: And that all its energy goes into raising water.) And how much energy is required to raise a liter of water 20 feet?

(Be sure to convert to standard units--meters, kilograms, watts, joules.)
 
  • #3
First, the depth of the well was meters, not feet. Second, I'm still not sure if I'm heading in the right direction. If water is 1 kg per liter, the work= F dx, and F= ma...then W= (1kg)(9.8 m/s sq.)(20m) = 196 J for each liter rased from the well. correct? If power is W/ dt, and I let the variable n equal the total number of liters raised, I set up an equation of (196)(n)/ 28800 sec = 1Watt. Solving for n gives me ~146.9 liters. Is this correct?
 
  • #4
If my memory is correct, for liquids, P = Q * density * height, where Q is flow in volume/unit time.
 
  • #5
You're still missing the horsepower. How many watts is 1 horsepower?
 

Related to Calculating Liters of Water Raised From Well

1. How do you calculate the liters of water raised from a well?

To calculate the liters of water raised from a well, you will need to know the flow rate (in liters per minute) and the pumping time (in minutes). Multiply the flow rate by the pumping time to get the total number of liters raised from the well.

2. What is the formula for calculating the liters of water raised from a well?

The formula for calculating the liters of water raised from a well is: Liters = Flow Rate (L/min) x Pumping Time (min).

3. Can the depth of the well affect the calculation of liters of water raised?

Yes, the depth of the well can affect the calculation of liters of water raised. The deeper the well, the higher the pressure and the faster the water will flow, which will impact the flow rate and therefore the total liters raised.

4. What is a common unit of measurement for flow rate in well water systems?

The most common unit of measurement for flow rate in well water systems is liters per minute (L/min). Other units such as gallons per minute (GPM) or cubic meters per hour (m3/h) may also be used.

5. How can knowing the liters of water raised from a well be helpful?

Knowing the liters of water raised from a well can be helpful in understanding the water supply and usage of a well. This information can also be used to monitor for any changes in the well's productivity and to calculate the cost of operating the well.

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