Calculating Mass of Meteors After Impact

In summary, the meteorite will apply a force of 6.41*1012 Newtons to the Earth, causing an acceleration of -1.00*108 meters per second2.
  • #1
DerekP
5
0
3. Suppose a meteorite collides with Earth with a force of 6.41*1012N.

A. What is the mass of the meteorite if it's impact speed is 10 km/s so that it has an acceleration of approximatley -1.00*108 m/s2

I know I want to use an equation from Newton's second law but what equation do I use? and how to I change it so I can plug it in(if I need to)?

I figured out I want to use [tex]\sum_{\rm all}\bold{F}\,=\,m\frac{d(\bold{v})}{dt}\,=\,m \bold{a}[/tex] (I believe) and I know I need these can anyone help me?

Acceleration = Net force divided by mass

Net force = rate of change of momentum

Net impulse = change of momentum
 
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  • #2
Is there a chance that you have more info than needed? Which one of Newton's laws relates mass, force, and acceleration?
 
  • #3
DerekP said:
3. Suppose a meteorite collides with Earth with a force of 6.41*1012N.

A. What is the mass of the meteorite if it's impact speed is 10 km/s so that it has an acceleration of approximatley -1.00*108 m/s2

I know I want to use an equation from Newton's second law but what equation do I use?
Newton's second law has only 1 equation. Look in your textbook.

and how to I change it so I can plug it in(if I need to)?

I figured out I want to use [tex]\sum_{\rm all}\bold{F}\,=\,m\frac{d(\bold{v})}{dt}\,=\,m \bold{a}[/tex] (I believe)
Yes, that equation is Newton's 2nd Law.

Of the various terms listed in the equation (F, m, a etc.), which ones are given in the problem statement? Which one are they asking for?
 
  • #4
DerekP said:
3. Suppose a meteorite collides with Earth with a force of 6.41*1012N.

A. What is the mass of the meteorite if it's impact speed is 10 km/s so that it has an acceleration of approximatley -1.00*108 m/s2

I know I want to use an equation from Newton's second law but what equation do I use? and how to I change it so I can plug it in(if I need to)?

I figured out I want to use [tex]\sum_{\rm all}\bold{F}\,=\,m\frac{d(\bold{v})}{dt}\,=\,m \bold{a}[/tex] (I believe) and I know I need these can anyone help me?

Acceleration = Net force divided by mass

Net force = rate of change of momentum

Net impulse = change of momentum
Derek,

First draw a picture:

http://img709.imageshack.us/img709/7478/fma1.jpg

In this picture, the meteorite will apply an external force on the Earth (during the collision), pointing to the right. By Newton's 3rd postulate, the Earth will apply an equal and opposite force on the meteorite to the left. But this makes physical sense, since the meteorite will slow down, and come to rest, so its acceleration vector must point in the opposite direction of its velocity vector.

Isolate the meteorite (in the dashed line circle), and apply Newton's 2nd postulate. As others were pointing out, in this thread, you don't need to know the meteorite's speed to answer the question posed. Hope this helps.If we zoom in on the collision, which lasts [tex] \Delta t[/tex] you'll see that a distance is required to bring the meteorite to rest. So there's going to be a crater. Hopefully, it's a small crater!

http://img693.imageshack.us/img693/7120/fma2z.jpg
 
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Related to Calculating Mass of Meteors After Impact

1. How is the mass of a meteor calculated after impact?

The mass of a meteor is calculated using the equation: Mass = density x volume. The density of a meteor can be determined by analyzing its composition. The volume can be calculated by measuring the size of the impact crater.

2. Why is it important to calculate the mass of a meteor after impact?

Calculating the mass of a meteor after impact can provide valuable information about the size and composition of the meteor. This information can help scientists understand the potential impact and damage of future meteor impacts on Earth.

3. What tools or methods are used to calculate the mass of a meteor after impact?

Scientists may use a variety of tools and methods to calculate the mass of a meteor after impact. This can include analyzing the size and shape of the impact crater, measuring the meteor's velocity and trajectory, and conducting chemical analysis of the meteor's composition.

4. Can the mass of a meteor change after impact?

Yes, the mass of a meteor can change after impact due to various factors such as fragmentation, evaporation, and erosion. Therefore, multiple calculations may be necessary to determine the most accurate mass of the meteor.

5. How does the mass of a meteor impact affect its potential damage?

The mass of a meteor can greatly affect its potential damage upon impact. A larger mass means a greater amount of energy upon impact, resulting in a larger impact crater and potentially more destruction. However, the angle and velocity of impact also play a role in determining the severity of damage.

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