Calculating Necessary Newtons for Turning a 1m Wheel with 1kg Mass and 1cm Width

In summary, the amount of force needed to turn the wheel will depend on the desired angular velocity and the time frame for reaching that velocity. The smaller the tangential force, the longer it will take to accelerate the wheel to a given rotational speed.
  • #1
eddybob123
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How much Newtons is needed to turn a wheel with radius 1 meter and mass of one kilogram and width of 1cm, exerting force on the outer circumference of the wheel and assuming no friction occurs?
 
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  • #2
eddybob123 said:
How much Newtons is needed to turn a wheel with radius 1 meter and mass of one kilogram and width of 1cm, exerting force on the outer circumference of the wheel and assuming no friction occurs?

You can use any amount of force you want. The only thing that will change is the angular acceleration. The smaller the tangential force, the smaller the torque, and hence the more time it will take to accelerate up to any given rotational speed.

In other words, to get a unique answer to your question, you must specify

- what angular velocity you want to reach
- how much time you want it to take to reach that angular velocity
 

What is the formula for calculating necessary Newtons?

The formula for calculating necessary Newtons is force = mass x acceleration, or F = ma.

What is the significance of a 1m wheel, 1kg mass, and 1cm width?

These measurements are important because they determine the moment of inertia for the wheel, which is a crucial factor in calculating the necessary Newtons for turning.

How do the dimensions of the wheel and mass affect the necessary Newtons?

The larger the wheel and mass, the greater the moment of inertia and therefore the more necessary Newtons will be required to turn it. The width of the wheel also plays a role, as a wider wheel will have a larger radius and thus a larger moment of inertia.

Are there any other factors that may affect the necessary Newtons?

Yes, there are other factors such as the surface on which the wheel is turning, the coefficient of friction, and any external forces acting on the wheel. These factors may increase or decrease the necessary Newtons required to turn the wheel.

How can the necessary Newtons be calculated experimentally?

The necessary Newtons can be calculated experimentally by measuring the force required to turn the wheel with a known mass and width. This can be repeated with different masses and widths to determine the relationship between necessary Newtons and these factors.

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