Calculating Vertical Force on a Fireman Sliding Down a Pole

In summary, the task was to find the magnitude and direction of the vertical force exerted by the pole on a fireman who weighs 100kg, as he slides down the pole with an acceleration of 3.0ms^-2. Using the equation ∑F=ma, the net force was found to be 300N vertically up. However, the correct answer was 680N vertically up. This is because the equation used only calculated the net force, and did not take into account the force of gravity acting on the fireman. Knowing this, we can use the equation ∑F=ma to find the force of gravity, and then use this information to solve for the force exerted by the pole
  • #1
Amelina Yoo
14
0

Homework Statement


Fireman weighs 100kg. He slides down a vertical pole with acceleration 3.0ms^-2.

a) Magnitude and direction of vertical force exerted by the pole on fireman?

Homework Equations


f=ma

The Attempt at a Solution


[/B]
f=ma
f=100(3.0)
f=300N vertically up.

But the answer says that it is actually 680N vertically up, and I do understand how they came to this conclusion.
Can you please explain where to go beyond this point? Or point out a mistake I may have made? Thank you.

I also replaced with acceleration with gravity, which did not work.
 
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  • #2
Your relevant equation is more correctly stated as:
∑F=ma

That is, the sum of all forces are equal to ma.
You found the net force from the firemans mass and acceleration, but you aren't asked for the net force, you are asked only for the force the pole exerts on the man.

What other force acts on the fireman?
What is it's magnitude? Can you use this information to solve for the poles force?
 
  • #3
Amelina Yoo said:
f=100(3.0)
f=300N vertically up
And yet, that acceleration is vertically down. Strange, don't you think?
 
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Related to Calculating Vertical Force on a Fireman Sliding Down a Pole

1. What is the vertical force?

The vertical force, also known as the vertical component of force, is the force that acts in an up or down direction, perpendicular to a surface or object. It is a vector quantity and is typically measured in Newtons (N).

2. How do you calculate the vertical force?

The vertical force can be calculated using the formula F = m x g, where F is the force, m is the mass of the object, and g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s² on Earth). This formula is based on Newton's second law of motion, which states that force equals mass times acceleration.

3. What factors affect the vertical force?

The vertical force is affected by the mass of the object and the acceleration due to gravity. The gravitational pull of different planets or celestial bodies also affects the vertical force, as the acceleration due to gravity may be different in these locations.

4. How does the vertical force relate to weight?

The vertical force is directly related to an object's weight. Weight is a measure of the force of gravity acting on an object, and it is equal to the mass of the object multiplied by the acceleration due to gravity. Therefore, weight is essentially the vertical force exerted on an object by the Earth's gravitational pull.

5. Why is it important to consider the vertical force in scientific experiments?

The vertical force is an essential factor to consider in scientific experiments because it can significantly affect the motion and behavior of objects. It is also crucial in engineering and construction, as it helps determine the stability and strength of structures. Understanding and accurately measuring the vertical force can lead to more accurate and reliable results in experiments and designs.

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