Can a DIY pulley system maximize storage space in the garage?

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In summary,-The space available is 8' Deep by 26" Wide-The drawer extension will be supported by a Slotted Angle secured to the garage ceiling beams-Between these two Angle's will be a 5' 10" Long x 26" Wide x 1/4" Thick piece of plywood-I will add three planks of wood that will attach under and between the Angles for additional support.-This was my original idea for moving the drawer-The space available is not enough to support the weight of the drawer if it is open and out of the mezzanine.-I would need to use a reductor of some type to attach the drawer to the mezz
  • #1
Element13
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TL;DR Summary
DIY project: large drawer, on small casters, in a long space
Hi Everyone,

After adding a small office in the garage and giving it space above it, between the ceiling of the garage and roof of the space, to store long rolls of materials, I had some extra space to the rolls but nothing long to place within it.

I then thought, if I build a long drawer, 8' L x 26" W which is the amount of space I have, and place it on small casters (10 total), I would maximize the space.

Well, yeah, except I have no idea what kind of motor I'd need to open and close said drawer. I then thought a garage door opener type of set up would work.

Not really knowing how much weight I'm going to be pulling, I thought I'd ask here for some advice, or for better ideas.

I thought of Large Drawer Sliders but they're a bit expensive, plus I think I would still need some kind of power to open and close the drawer.

A pulley system?

So, any advice or better ideas to make this work?Peace,
Element13
 
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  • #2
Once the drawer is open and out of the mezzanine, what do you think will hold the weight?
Could it open sideways instead?
 
  • #3
You don't give any details on available space and obstacles, so take this as a conceptual suggestion. Five pulleys and a rope, with a block attached to the ends of the rope. The block is attached to the drawer. The lowest pulley gets the rope down (or up, or off to the side) so that you can pull on it. The rope is tensioned either by how it is attached to the block, or by making one of the pulleys adjustable. You could put a crank on any pulley that has 180 degrees of wrap. That pulley would be a V-belt pulley to get better grip on the rope.
Drawer.jpg
 
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  • #4
jrmichler and Lnewqban

Thank you both for responding, and my apologies for not being clearer or giving more info.
Maybe this can help
drawer-space_01.jpg

this is the space available, 8' Deep by 26" Wide

drawer-support.jpg

This is the support for the drawer extension. the other end(s) would be supported by similar Slotted Angle, secured to the garage's ceiling beams, similar to how the garage door system is supported.

These, will be help in place using shelf-like brackets, outlined by the red lines; again one on each side.

Between these two Angle's will be a 5' 10" Long x 26" Wide x 1/4" Thick piece of ply. I will add three planks of wood that will attach under and between the Angles for additional support. (not shown)
storage_drawer_sideview_01.jpg

This was my original idea for moving the drawer

As a side note, I would mount the motor on the facing Plywood, in the first two photos.

Hope this helps, but please, if there's anything else that can help you help me, let me know.Peace,
Element13
 
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  • #5
Lnewqban said:
Once the drawer is open and out of the mezzanine, what do you think will hold the weight?
Could it open sideways instead?
Lnewqban,
I realized that I didn't reply to you directly, like I should have. please see above; and no, it can only open in one direction.

Peace,
Element13
 
  • #6
jrmichler said:
You don't give any details on available space and obstacles, so take this as a conceptual suggestion. Five pulleys and a rope, with a block attached to the ends of the rope. The block is attached to the drawer. The lowest pulley gets the rope down (or up, or off to the side) so that you can pull on it. The rope is tensioned either by how it is attached to the block, or by making one of the pulleys adjustable. You could put a crank on any pulley that has 180 degrees of wrap. That pulley would be a V-belt pulley to get better grip on the rope.
View attachment 302064
jrmichler,

I realized that I didn't reply to you directly, like I should have. please see above.

Peace,
Element13
 
  • #7
Element13 said:
Lnewqban,
I realized that I didn't reply to you directly, like I should have. please see above; and no, it can only open in one direction.
Peace,
Element13
I believe that you replied with post 14, no problem at all. :cool:

It seems to me that it may be difficult to see and reach what you need to handle inside that drawer, considering the space between its side top edge and the ceiling.

If that were true, I would consider:
1) Do as you have planned but using smaller inter-linked drawers that can be removed from the extension one by one.
2) Create an additional lifting mechanism for the extension-long drawer.

The rpm's of any motor in direct coupling would be too much for the proposed pulley system.
You will need to use a reductor of some type.
The cheapest one could be a connecting nut anchored to the bottom of the drawer and an all-thread rod in direct coupling with a small electrical motor, controlled by two limiting switches.
 
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  • #8
If you are determined to open and close using a motor, I suggest taking a long hard look at a standard garage door opener. Garage door openers have everything you need for motion control built in. A gear reduction to an appropriate speed, adjustable limit stops, and overload shutdown. If you do not have room to use the entire door opener, you can use the power head to drive a pulley system as shown in your sketch in Post #4. If the necessary travel distance is farther than the door opener allows, change to a larger sprocket or pulley. And the cost is less than anything you design by the time you get the speed right, limit stops working properly, and an overload shutdown calibrated and working.
 
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  • #9
Lnewqban said:
I believe that you replied with post 14, no problem at all. :cool:

It seems to me that it may be difficult to see and reach what you need to handle inside that drawer, considering the space between its side top edge and the ceiling.

If that were true, I would consider:
1) Do as you have planned but using smaller inter-linked drawers that can be removed from the extension one by one.
2) Create an additional lifting mechanism for the extension-long drawer.

The rpm's of any motor in direct coupling would be too much for the proposed pulley system.
You will need to use a reductor of some type.
The cheapest one could be a connecting nut anchored to the bottom of the drawer and an all-thread rod in direct coupling with a small electrical motor, controlled by two limiting switches.
Lnewqban,

Thank you for your time and advice on this.
The pulley system was what I thought of if I couldn't use a motor but, seeing as it will be primarily used by the wife, I thought a motor would be best.
Ideally I would like to use an electric motor/garage door opener, as hinted by you and echoed by jrmichler.
I'll post the outcome when it's done.

Again, Thank You.

Peace,
Element13
 
  • #10
jrmichler said:
If you are determined to open and close using a motor, I suggest taking a long hard look at a standard garage door opener. Garage door openers have everything you need for motion control built in. A gear reduction to an appropriate speed, adjustable limit stops, and overload shutdown. If you do not have room to use the entire door opener, you can use the power head to drive a pulley system as shown in your sketch in Post #4. If the necessary travel distance is farther than the door opener allows, change to a larger sprocket or pulley. And the cost is less than anything you design by the time you get the speed right, limit stops working properly, and an overload shutdown calibrated and working.
jrmichler,

Thank you for your time and advice on this, as well.
I may be a bit over my head on this but I like a good challenge.
I looked into purchasing a garage door opener and I think the wife may need to start working out at the gym to get the pulley system working.
But seriously, yeah, I do believe what I want will require a garage door opener or a DIY motor set-up.
I'll start looking on ebay, nextdoor, facebook marketplace, and the like; maybe I'll find a good used one.
And, as I mentioned, I'll post the outcome, whichever, when it's done.

Again, Thank You.

Peace,
Element13
 
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  • #11
Okay, so after several weeks of tinkering around, I'm finally done.

My initial thought of needing a motor to open and closed the drawer were a bit exaggerated, okay maybe over exaggerated, but I've learned things I didn't know before and that's always a plus.

The wife can open and closed the drawer using the pulley system, without too much effort, so that settled the motor issue.

Thank you all for your advise in the matter.

Peace,
Element13
 

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Related to Can a DIY pulley system maximize storage space in the garage?

1. Can a DIY pulley system really maximize storage space in the garage?

Yes, a DIY pulley system can be a great way to maximize storage space in the garage. By utilizing vertical space, it allows for items to be stored overhead and frees up floor space for other items.

2. How much weight can a DIY pulley system hold?

The weight capacity of a DIY pulley system will depend on the materials used and the strength of the pulleys and ropes. However, with proper construction and use of sturdy materials, a DIY pulley system can typically hold a significant amount of weight.

3. Is it difficult to install a DIY pulley system in the garage?

The difficulty of installing a DIY pulley system will depend on your level of experience and the complexity of the system you are building. However, there are many tutorials and instructional videos available online to guide you through the process.

4. Can a DIY pulley system be adjusted or modified if I need to change the storage layout in my garage?

Yes, one of the benefits of a DIY pulley system is that it can be easily adjusted or modified to fit your changing storage needs. You can add or remove pulleys, adjust the height of the ropes, and rearrange the layout of the system as needed.

5. Are there any safety concerns with using a DIY pulley system in the garage?

As with any DIY project, safety should always be a top priority. It is important to use sturdy materials, follow proper construction techniques, and regularly inspect the system for any signs of wear or damage. It is also recommended to have someone assist you when using the pulley system to prevent any accidents or injuries.

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