Can combustor on piston engine?

In summary, the conversation discusses an unconventional internal combustion engine that uses a can combustor and turbos to force combustion gases towards the piston. The engine is designed to eliminate obstructions such as valves and can achieve high flow numbers. However, there are concerns about the engine's design and feasibility.
  • #1
uknowho
2
0
I found this engine amoung the many on the web from inventors out there. Essentially this person adapted a can combustor onto an inline cylinder engine with turbos. Below I pasted the description from the site. What are your thoughts on this one?


http://video.educa.ma/internal-combustion-engine-lMp!uKmClLOmm9k.html
Description:
This is a 2 stroke inline cylinder internal combustion engine. The combustion takes place in the intake runner as opposed to the cylinder like that in a traditional ICE. A wall of high pressure air generated by the turbos and enhanced by the counter-rotating radial and axial swirl vanes force the combustion gases in the direction of the piston. Thus forcing it down which exposes the exhaust ports in the cylinder walls where the exhaust gases exit into the turbos. Note there are no obstructions such as valves in the way of either the intake or exhaust track. This engine can produce flow numbers OHV engines can never achieve. The ring package on the piston is below the exhaust ports which minimizes oil loss and harmful emissions common in 2 strokes. At no point do the rings pass over the exhaust port. Since the combustion takes place in the intake runner there is no concern of leakage of the raw fuel into the exhaust port. The piston is not used to draw in the fuel/air charge but serves as a valve sealing off the exhaust port. This engine performs the exhaust and intake step at the same time. Which is when the piston is at BDC to TDC. The compression and combustion take place simultaneously as well which is when the piston is TDC through BDC. This makes the engine far more powerful and efficient than a 4 stroke engine common in most automobile.
 
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  • #2
First, that's a horrible animation. It jumps frame to frame so quickly I can't follow the flow path.
Second, the basic premise just sounds implausible to me. Would not the pressure up-stream of combustion (the "wall of high pressure air generated by the turbos and enhanced by the counter-rotating radial and axial swirl vanes") have to be greater than the combustion pressure?

Also: "The ring package on the piston is below the exhaust ports." If so, then what contains the pressure for moving the piston?
 

Related to Can combustor on piston engine?

1. Can a combustor be used on a piston engine?

Yes, a combustor can be used on a piston engine. A combustor is a component that is responsible for mixing fuel and air and igniting it to create combustion. This process is crucial for producing the power necessary to run a piston engine.

2. How does a combustor work on a piston engine?

A combustor on a piston engine works by taking in a mixture of fuel and air, compressing it, and igniting it with a spark plug. The resulting explosion creates hot gases that expand and push the piston, which in turn, rotates the crankshaft and powers the engine.

3. What are the benefits of using a combustor on a piston engine?

Using a combustor on a piston engine allows for more efficient combustion and better control over the fuel-air mixture. This results in improved fuel efficiency, increased power output, and reduced emissions.

4. Is a combustor necessary for a piston engine to function?

No, a combustor is not necessary for a piston engine to function. In a diesel engine, combustion occurs through compression rather than a combustor. However, a combustor can be added to a diesel engine for improved performance and emissions control.

5. What are the different types of combustors that can be used on a piston engine?

There are two main types of combustors that can be used on a piston engine: carbureted and fuel-injected. Carbureted combustors mix fuel and air before entering the engine, while fuel-injected combustors inject fuel directly into the combustion chamber. Both types have their advantages and disadvantages, with fuel-injected combustors being more efficient and precise but also more complex and expensive.

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