Classic double-slit experiment in a new light

In summary: From the main article:The incident plane wave (blue) resonantly excites a core electron on one of two equivalent ##Ir## sites at ##r_1## and ##r_2##. This intermediate state decays to a quasi-molecular final state, which is delocalized over both sites, i.e., without which-path information. The emitted x-rays interfere with each other, giving rise to a double-slit-type sinusoidal interference pattern as a function of the transferred momentum ##q##, which points along ##r_1 − r_2##.This supports what @mfb has said above.
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Wrichik Basu
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An intense beam of high-energy X-ray photons (violet) hits two adjacent iridium atoms (green) in the crystal. This excites electrons in the atoms for a short time. The atoms emit X-ray photons which overlap behind the two iridium atoms (red) and can be analyzed as interference images.

Credit: Markus Grueninger, University of Cologne

An international research team led by physicists from Collaborative Research Centre 1238, 'Control and Dynamics of Quantum Materials' at the University of Cologne has implemented a new variant of the basic double-slit experiment using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the European Synchrotron ESRF in Grenoble. This new variant offers a deeper understanding of the electronic structure of solids. Writing in Science Advances, the research group have now presented their results under the title 'Resonant inelastic x-ray incarnation of Young's double-slit experiment'.

Related news.

Journal reference:

A. Revelli, et al.
Resonant inelastic x-ray incarnation of Young’s double-slit experiment. Science Advances, 2019 DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav4020

Last Edit: Inserted correct picture.
 

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  • #2
Please note that the Science Daily article shows the wrong picture thumbnail ie mentions ingestible robots. However, if you click on it you’ll see the diffraction image in the first post of this thread.
 
  • #3
jedishrfu said:
Please note that the Science Daily article shows the wrong picture thumbnail ie mentions ingestible robots. However, if you click on it you’ll see the diffraction image in the first post of this thread.
They have corrected their mistake. Now, the proper picture can be seen.
 
  • #4
Not when I just clicked the link now. I even refreshed the page and it’s still there.

Perhaps they have another updated link or it’s a browser specific problem.
 
  • #5
jedishrfu said:
Not when I just clicked the link now. I even refreshed the page and it’s still there.

Perhaps they have another updated link or it’s a browser specific problem.
Could be browser specific. When I edited the post the last time, I could view the correct picture. I can see it now as well. Maybe it has something to do with cookies.
 
  • #6
Ahh, it’s Girl Scout cookie time in the US that explains it. :-)
 
  • #7
Wrichik Basu said:
This excites electrons in the atoms for a short time.
I have a bit of a problem with that. If there are two different atoms absorbing then emitting, then how can the phases of the two 'slits' be consistent and how can a coherent interference pattern form? There must be something I am missing - what is it?
 
  • #8
Only one of them absorbs it, but "we don't know which one" and the process is coherent.
 
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  • #9
sophiecentaur said:
I have a bit of a problem with that. If there are two different atoms absorbing then emitting, then how can the phases of the two 'slits' be consistent and how can a coherent interference pattern form? There must be something I am missing - what is it?
From the main article:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.aav4020 said:
The incident plane wave (blue) resonantly excites a core electron on one of two equivalent ##Ir## sites at ##r_1## and ##r_2##. This intermediate state decays to a quasi-molecular final state, which is delocalized over both sites, i.e., without which-path information. The emitted x-rays interfere with each other, giving rise to a double-slit-type sinusoidal interference pattern as a function of the transferred momentum ##q##, which points along ##r_1 − r_2##.
Emphasis added.

This supports what @mfb has said above.
 
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  • #10
I was confused by the term "inelastic scattering" in the extract above when it seems that, in the paper (which I looked at later), they refer to "elastic" scattering. That would make a difference to whether there was phase coherence or not - I would have thought?
 
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1. What is the classic double-slit experiment?

The classic double-slit experiment is a fundamental experiment in quantum mechanics that demonstrates the wave-particle duality of light. It involves shining a beam of light through two parallel slits and observing the interference pattern that is created on a screen behind the slits.

2. How does the double-slit experiment challenge our understanding of light?

The double-slit experiment challenges our understanding of light by showing that light behaves as both a wave and a particle. This is known as the wave-particle duality, which is a fundamental principle in quantum mechanics.

3. What is the new light being shed on the classic double-slit experiment?

The new light being shed on the classic double-slit experiment is the use of advanced technologies such as single-photon detectors and quantum entanglement to further understand the behavior of light. These technologies have allowed scientists to perform the experiment with a higher level of precision and gain new insights into the nature of light.

4. What are some of the key findings from recent experiments using the double-slit setup?

Recent experiments using the double-slit setup have revealed that the behavior of light is influenced by the act of observation, known as the observer effect. They have also shown that light can exhibit both wave-like and particle-like behavior simultaneously, depending on the experimental setup.

5. How does the double-slit experiment relate to the broader field of quantum mechanics?

The double-slit experiment is a cornerstone of quantum mechanics and has played a crucial role in shaping our understanding of the quantum world. It has been used to test and validate many of the principles and theories in quantum mechanics, such as the uncertainty principle and the wave-particle duality.

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