Compensating Robot Arm Deflection for End Weight

In summary, the speaker is working on a robotics project that involves compensating for the bending of an arm due to an end weight. They can calculate the deflection at the end of the arm for a given weight, but struggle with determining the correct angle for the beam to achieve a target angle after the deflection is applied. They are looking for mathematical insights on how to express the deflection function in terms of the vertical component of the weight force.
  • #1
barry_scott
3
0
Hi guys, I'm doing a robotics project that requires me to compensate for the bending of the arm due to an end weight. I can calculate the deflection at the end of the arm for a given weight e.g.

End link horizontal (90 degrees), end weight = 1000g, deflection = 10mm
From this i can calculate the angle down to the deflected end point eg 3 degrees. Now the problem comes when i try to compensate for this deflection to get the end point to where i actually need it to be. Simply aiming the arm 3 degrees higher won't work as changing the beam angle changes the amount of deflection at it's end!

So basically given a target angle, say 90 degrees i need to know what actual angle to put the beam at so that when the deflection is applied the end point is at 90 degrees. But this requires me to know the beam angle to calculate the deflection to find the beam angle?

This is confusing me greatly and any mathematical insights would be greatly appreciated!
 
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  • #2
You need to express the deflection function ##D(F,\varphi)## with a weight force ##F## at an angle ##\varphi##, which in your example was ##\varphi=90°## as a function of ##D(F_v,\varphi## instead, where only the vertical component ##F_v## of ##F## plays a role, since it is all which causes the deflection. ##F_v## is dependent on ##\varphi##. In the end you can solve for ##D(F_v,\varphi)=0##.
 

1. What is meant by "Compensating Robot Arm Deflection for End Weight"?

Compensating robot arm deflection for end weight refers to the process of adjusting and balancing the weight of the end effector (or tool) attached to a robotic arm to ensure that the arm remains stable and accurately follows its intended path during operation.

2. Why is it important to compensate for end weight in robotic arms?

Compensating for end weight is important because it helps to prevent deflection (bending) of the robotic arm, which can affect its accuracy and precision. It also helps to minimize the strain on the motors and joints of the arm, prolonging its lifespan.

3. How is end weight compensation achieved in robotic arms?

End weight compensation can be achieved through various methods, such as using counterweights, adjusting the arm's center of gravity, or incorporating sensors and control algorithms to dynamically adjust the arm's movements based on the weight of the end effector.

4. What are some common challenges in compensating for end weight in robotic arms?

Some common challenges in compensating for end weight include accurately measuring the weight of the end effector, accounting for changes in weight during operation (e.g. when picking up or releasing objects), and ensuring that the compensation does not negatively affect the overall performance of the robotic arm.

5. Are there any other factors to consider when compensating for end weight in robotic arms?

Yes, other factors to consider include the arm's speed and acceleration, the material and design of the end effector, and the stability of the base upon which the arm is mounted. These factors can all affect the amount of deflection and the effectiveness of end weight compensation.

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