Converting Lux to W/m^2 for Solar Radiation Measurement

In summary: I seriously doubt it, 550nm is in the green part of the spectrum. Shorter wavelength than redDid you really mean to say "my green laser" ?Red lasers are usually around the 633nm.
  • #1
SilverSparrow
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TL;DR Summary
Need help to convert Lux into W/m^2 (is it even possible?).

If not, how else can I measure intensity of light which would give me a result in W/m^2?
For a physics project, I'm planning to investigate the relationship between the number of slits in a diffraction grating and the intensity of the central maxima. The light meter which I'm planning to use to measure the intensity gives me a result in LUX.

I know the wavelength of the red laser light which I'm using is approximately 550 nm. I'm wondering if it's at all possible to use a conversion to change the lux value in W/m^2?

If not, is there any other way I could possibly measure the intensity of the central maxima that would give me a result in w/m^2?

Thank you so much.
 
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  • #2
What makes you think there is such a conversion? If I had a zillion watts per m2 of IR or UV on a surface, I'd still have zero lumens (and therefore lux).
 
  • #3
Vanadium 50 said:
What makes you think there is such a conversion? If I had a zillion watts per m2 of IR or UV on a surface, I'd still have zero lumens (and therefore lux).

The OP says the light in question is 550nm so a conversion is reasonable.
 
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  • #4
hutchphd said:
The OP says the light in question is 550nm so a conversion is reasonable.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminosity_function

1600706019497.png
 
  • #5
hutchphd said:
The OP says the light in question is 550nm

Ah...missed that.
 
  • #6
SilverSparrow said:
Summary:: Need help to convert Lux into W/m^2 (is it even possible?).I know the wavelength of the red laser light which I'm using is approximately 550 nm. I'm wondering if it's at all possible to use a conversion to change the lux value in W/m^2?

One needs to include the value of the photometric curve at (eye sensitivity) at 650nm. I point out that 550nm light is not red! I assume you mean 650 ??
 
  • #7
SilverSparrow said:
I know the wavelength of the red laser light which I'm using is approximately 550 nm. I'm wondering if it's at all possible to use a conversion to change the lux value in W/m^2?
If the wavelength stays the same, the conversion is a constant factor, therefore either lux or W/m2 should be suitable for comparing different intensity measurements. Why do you specifically need W/m2?
 
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  • #8
I thought I could help the OP using information from the Wiki article linked by @berkeman . It says

1600706544790.png


Aha, that number 683.002 looks like a luminosity to power conversion factor, so I googled that. LOL, The Internet sometimes takes us in strange directions. Here is the results I got for 683.002.

  • Texas Transportation Code § 683.002 | FindLaw
  • American Standard 1660.683.002 10-Inch Modern Rain Easy Clean Showerhead,
  • Docket Nos. ER03-683-002 and ER03-683-003 2 Notice of Filings and Responsive
  • Mirror, Chest. 683-002 Dresser
  • Sec. 683.002. ABANDONED MOTOR VEHICLE
  • But it finally found the right one.
Lux - Wikipedia
wikipedia.3x.png
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lux
For monochromatic light of this wavelength, the amount of illuminance for a given amount of irradiance is maximum: 683.002 lux per 1 W/m 2; the irradiance needed to make 1 lux at this wavelength is about 1.464 mW/m 2. Other wavelengths of visible light produce fewer lux per watt-per-meter-squared.
 
  • #9
SilverSparrow said:
Summary:: Need help to convert Lux into W/m^2 (is it even possible?).

If not, how else can I measure intensity of light which would give me a result in W/m^2?

I know the wavelength of the red laser light which I'm using is approximately 550 nm.

I seriously doubt it, 550nm is in the green part of the spectrum. Shorter wavelength than red
Did you really mean to say "my green laser" ?

Red lasers are usually around the 633nm
 
  • #10
The peak of the luminosity function is at 555 nm (green); the eye’s visual system is more sensitive to light of this wavelength than any other. For monochromatic light of this wavelength, the irradiance needed to make one lux is minimum, at 1.464 mW/m2.

That is, one obtains 683.002 lux per W/m2 (or lumens per watt) at this wavelength. Other wavelengths of visible light produce fewer lumens per watt.

Solar Radiation is a shorter wave length and different color spectrum, so it has a different factor of Lux to W/m2:

Bright sunlight is approximately 136000 lux = 1075 W/m2 = 126.7

The factor changes slightly depending on time of day, conditions such as cloud cover, moisture in the air etc. and most sources agree on the 126.7 as a reasonable factor to use.

The conversion in the green visible light spectrum spectrum at 555nm is 1W/m2 = 683 lux, and is used of human eyes.

Some of our weather stations allow to calibrate the gain to whatever light spectrum you wish to base solar radiation on.
 

Related to Converting Lux to W/m^2 for Solar Radiation Measurement

What is the conversion factor for Lux to W/m^2?

The conversion factor for Lux to W/m^2 is 1 Lux = 1 W/m^2. This means that 1 Lux is equal to 1 Watt of radiant power per square meter.

Why is it important to convert Lux to W/m^2?

Converting Lux to W/m^2 allows for a more accurate measurement of the intensity of light. Lux only takes into account the visible spectrum of light, while W/m^2 includes all wavelengths of light. This is particularly important in scientific research and applications where the full spectrum of light is relevant.

What is the formula for converting Lux to W/m^2?

The formula for converting Lux to W/m^2 is: W/m^2 = Lux x (wavelength in meters)^3 x (frequency in Hz).

Can Lux and W/m^2 be used interchangeably?

No, Lux and W/m^2 cannot be used interchangeably. While they both measure the intensity of light, they take into account different aspects of light. Lux measures the amount of visible light, while W/m^2 measures the amount of light across all wavelengths.

Is there a difference between Lux and W/m^2 in terms of units?

Yes, there is a difference in the units used for Lux and W/m^2. Lux is measured in lumens per square meter (lm/m^2), while W/m^2 is measured in Watts per square meter (W/m^2).

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