Copper's Valence Electrons: How Can It Lose More Than One?

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In summary, copper has one valence electron but can lose more than one when forming cupric compounds. This may seem contradictory to the idea that only valence electrons can jump to higher orbitals, but in the case of copper, one of the electrons in the 3d orbital becomes the valence electron due to the more stable configuration of completely filled orbitals. This allows for the possibility of losing more than one electron when forming compounds.
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Johnleprekan
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Copper has one valence electron, but it can lose more than one when forming cupric compounds. I had thought it could only lose the valence electron. How can this happen?

If this is true, how does an electron from the d orbital jump to a higher orbital if only valence electrons can make the jump?
 
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The general electronic configuration of 3d elements is 3d1-104s1-2. As one moves gradually along the group the electrons get filled to the 3d orbitals. So by that condition copper should have the electronic configuration as 3d94s2. But since completely filled orbitals are more stable an electron jumps back to 3d, giving the configuration as 3d104s1. So one of the electrons in 3d orbital is the valence electron itself. Thats the reason why all those happen...
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What is the valence electron configuration of copper?

Copper has a valence electron configuration of [Ar] 3d10 4s1, meaning it has one valence electron in the 4s orbital and 10 valence electrons in the 3d orbital.

How many valence electrons does copper have?

Copper has 1 valence electron, as it is located in the 4s orbital, which is the outermost orbital of the copper atom.

How can copper lose more than one valence electron?

Copper can lose more than one valence electron by losing electrons from both the 4s and 3d orbitals. This is due to copper's unique electron configuration, where the 4s orbital is actually higher in energy than the 3d orbital.

Why is it important for copper to lose more than one valence electron?

Copper's ability to lose more than one valence electron allows it to form various compounds and participate in different chemical reactions. This flexibility is crucial for its use in various industrial and biological processes.

What are some common compounds formed by copper's valence electrons?

Some common compounds formed by copper's valence electrons include copper oxide (CuO), copper sulfate (CuSO4), and copper carbonate (CuCO3). These compounds have various uses in industries such as electronics, agriculture, and medicine.

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